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Wednesday, October 2
 

8:00am

CLS Pre-Conference Meet Up Day
The pre-conference day at CLS is composed of informal self-organized meet ups. Please note that this program was not constituted as part of the formal conference program, therefore, if you have questions about the meetings or workshops, we will make sure to connect you with the organizers. Contact us at dmlhub@hri.uci.edu.

Pre-conference info (with signup form)



Wednesday October 2, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm

9:00am

Developing an eSports-based STEM Curriculum
Limited Capacity filling up

I would like to gather folks who are interested in developing high school and collegiate-level curricular materials that are supported by eSports. There is a great opportunity as eSports expands into high schools and colleges not only with an eye toward competition but also to learning.

Signup

Speakers
AB

Anthony Betrus

Professor of Ed Tech/Esports Director, SUNY Potsdam


Wednesday October 2, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm
Doheny A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

9:00am

Annual Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) Meet-Up
Limited Capacity seats available

The Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network is an open collective of scholars and teacher educators that research and teach aspects of Connected Learning in teacher education. We have four main working groups: Scholarship, Pedagogy, Communication, and Equity. Each working group develops resources and opportunities for us to connect and exchange ideas such as: virtual writing retreats, international twitter chats, co-authored publications, presentations, and special issues, and a Marginal Syllabus on CLinTE. Members can learn about and join CLinTE activities/workgroups by joining our CLinTE Listserv. At the CLS annual meeting, participants will have the opportunity to meet in workgroups to get updates about past projects and propose projects for the new year. This year we will highlight two main topics: 'Developing graduate programs in Connected Learning,' and 'CLinTE Marginal Syllabus.'
[Signup Form]

Speakers
avatar for Kira J Baker-Doyle

Kira J Baker-Doyle

Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago


Wednesday October 2, 2019 9:00am - 1:00pm
Emerald C 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

9:00am

Luggage hold
Luggage will also be stored in this space. Check-in desk will be located outside the room.


Wednesday October 2, 2019 9:00am - 5:00pm
Crescent B 311 W Peltason Dr, Irvine, CA 92697

9:00am

Quiet Room
Chill out in peace and quiet! No talking, meeting groups, or phone calls in this room please.




Wednesday October 2, 2019 9:00am - 5:00pm
Crescent A 311 W Peltason Dr, Irvine, CA 92697

11:00am

Data Jam
Limited Capacity seats available

Twin Cities PBS (Momo Hayakawa and Dennis Ramirez) in collaboration with partners from UCI, are hosting a Data Jam using telemetry produced by Hero Elementary games and apps.

[Signup Form]

Speakers
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Digital Program Manager - Ready To Learn, Twin Cities Public Television
Dennis Ramirez is the Digital Program Manager at Twin Cities Public Television, and an award winning educational game designer. Dennis is interested in how new technologies are used in, and out, of the classroom to support learning. His main area of research focuses on how failure... Read More →
avatar for Momoko Hayakawa

Momoko Hayakawa

Researcher, Twin Cities PBS
Momo Hayakawa is a Education Research and Analytics Associate for the Ready to Learn (RTL) project at Twin Cities PBS (TPT). She oversees RTL’s external evaluation conducted by WestEd and manages the design, implementation, and evaluation of the program. Her research interests lie... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 11:00am - 5:00pm
Emerald A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

12:00pm

Game-based and Gamified Assessments
Limited Capacity full

Game-based and Gamified Assessments [Signup Form]

There is little doubt that the shift from offline- to online learning environments goes hand in hand with an increasing use of gamification- and game-based learning strategies. The potential benefits of digital game-based learning (GBL) applications and strategies have been explored thoroughly, as have their limitations. However, games are at the verge of becoming significant elements in the educational sector not only as enablers of effective learning experiences: in recent years, the assessment of learning processes through gamified and game-based means (GBL/A) has also become a growing trend that promises to transform the educational sector even further.

Game-based approaches to learning assessment can take various forms: First, game-based approaches to learning assessment can either rely on the gamification of conventional testing situations, or on the creation of actual testing game environments.

Second, game-based assessment approaches can either serve the sole purpose of testing, or they can be part of a broader game-based learning approach, in which game-based tools are used for enabling as well as evaluating learning experiences.

And finally, the difference between game-based learning and game-based assessment can either be explicit or done in a way that is hardly noticeable by learners.

Dr. Alexander Pfeiffer (MIT) and Dr. Nikolaus König (Danube-University Krems) like to suggest, discuss and improve a classification of game-based approaches to assessment in the context of education. Furthermore, they like to showcase two prototypes that store results of the learning outcome on (the Ardor) blockchain. (further information about the project behind: https://alexpfeiffer.mit.edu/.


Speakers
AP

Alexander Pfeiffer

Senior Researcher, MIT
NK

Nikolaus Koenig

Researcher, Danube-University


Wednesday October 2, 2019 12:00pm - 4:00pm
Doheny C/D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

12:00pm

Networked Educators Meet-Up
Limited Capacity seats available

This pre-conference event is open to educators who participate in and lead connected learning networks across cultural institutions, museums, nonprofits and community organizations. Networks of educators include communities of practice similar to Hive, Remake Learning (Pittsburgh), and the Chicago Learning Exchange. We hope to see educators from networks across cities, ecosystems, communities, and contexts. This pre-conference event is also open to those who currently do not participate in this kind of network but might want to learn how to start one in their own city.

At the event, participants will share what it means to participate in these kinds of networks—highlighting what works well and rethinking areas of improvement. Connected learning educators will have the opportunity to discuss how these networks serve as professional learning opportunities and how they bring ideas, such as innovations uncovered by attending the Connected Learning Summit, back into their networks.

Participants in this pre-conference event will also get to expand their own professional contacts by meeting colleagues from across the country who are members of similar networks.

Signup

Speakers
avatar for Edgar ‘Edge’ Quintanilla

Edgar ‘Edge’ Quintanilla

Digital Manager - DiscoverDesign.org, Chicago Architecture Center
avatar for Ani Martinez

Ani Martinez

Field Director, Remake Learning
WB

Wade Berger

Graduate Student, Northwestern University Learning Sciences


Wednesday October 2, 2019 12:00pm - 4:00pm
Doheny B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

12:00pm

Walden Game Worshop
Limited Capacity seats available

Workshop for educators interested in bringing humanities-focused games into their classrooms with Walden, a game as the primary example. Hands on play, discussion of example curriculum and discussion of best practices. Copies of the game and curriculum will be provided to all participants.
[Signup Form]

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Hamilton

Matthew Hamilton

Research Associate, University of Southern California
I am a PhD student in Educational Psychology at the University of Southern California, working with Dr. Brendesha Tynes. I study the intersections between play-based learning, technology, and struggles for liberation from systems of oppression. I am particularly interested in game... Read More →
TF

Tracy Fullerton

Director at USC Game Innovation Lab, USC Games


Wednesday October 2, 2019 12:00pm - 4:00pm
Emerald D/E 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

1:30pm

Reclaiming Digital Futures Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

In a session geared towards educators and organizational leaders working in community-based organizations (afterschool programs, museums, libraries, clubs), partner organizations from the Reclaiming Digital Futures project will share how-to’s of organizational approaches and best practices you can draw on to achieve success in youth-centered digital learning.

The workshop will be participatory, with attendees collaborating and thinking with peers about shared problems of practice around implementing community-based diigtal learning programs, including questions of capacity building, pedagogy, community connections, and usage of digital tools.
For more information about the toolkit please click here https://digitallearningpractices.org/

[Signup Form]

Speakers
JF

Joselina Fay

Associate Director, Art Center Programs, DreamYard Project
avatar for Rafi Santo

Rafi Santo

CSforALL, Telos Learning
AN

Anjel Newman

AS220 Youth
MR

Mary Reisenwitz

Special Projects Manager, Digital Harbor Foundation
avatar for Haviland Rummel

Haviland Rummel

Executive Director, Susan Crown Exchange (SCE)
Haviland Rummel is the Program Director at SCE, where she leads the organization’s strategy and grantmaking. She has worked with a variety of nonprofits across sectors including cultural institutions, human service agencies, educational institutions, and healthcare organizations... Read More →
JR

Jerelyn Rodriguez

Cofounder and CEO, The Knowledge House
DT

Daniel Thorson

YOUmedia Assistant Manager, Chicago Public Library
avatar for Jeff McCarter

Jeff McCarter

Founder & Executive Director, Free Spirit Media
JA

June Anh

University of California, Irvine
CS

Calvin Stalvig

Beam Center


Wednesday October 2, 2019 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Pacific Ballroom A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

Playful Assessment Designathon
Limited Capacity full

Education is moving toward more playful, authentic, student-centered, and project-based learning. But assessment has not kept up! At the MIT Playful Journey Lab, we work on designing assessment tools and approaches that incorporate play to capture future-ready skills. We aim to uncover the ways play can make assessment more engaging, personalized, and accurate—and we hope to inspire educators to create their own playful assessments.

In order to infuse our ideas with fresh perspectives and bring more people into the playful assessment community, we are excited to host a Playful Assessment Designathon on the day before Connected Learning. It will be open to everyone interested in making assessment more fun and less stressful. Held in an unconference style, we will come with a couple of prompts and challenges related to the Playful Journey Lab’s work in embedded assessment and game-based assessment. And we will open the floor to participants to suggest needs they see in assessment or ideas they would like to explore. We will form groups organically and spend the time designing, prototyping, and imagining a more playful future for assessment!

If you plan to join us, please RSVP here: https://forms.gle/5ZU9UoqaZdpec9TZ8
(Last minute participants are still welcome without RSVP.)

[Signup Form]

Speakers
YM

Yumiko Murai

Postdoctoral Associate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Louisa Rosenheck

Louisa Rosenheck

Associate Director, MIT Playful Journey Lab
Louisa Rosenheck is the Associate Director and Creative Lead of the MIT Playful Journey Lab. She manages the design, content, and development of educational games and software, and oversees the research on how ed tech can be effectively used in both formal and informal educational... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Doheny A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697
 
Thursday, October 3
 

8:00am

AM Coffee and Pastries
Come enjoy some coffee/tea and pastries before the featured event!

Thursday October 3, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am
Pacific Ballroom Foyer 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

8:00am

Luggage hold
Luggage will also be stored in this space. Check-in desk will be located outside the room.



Thursday October 3, 2019 8:00am - 7:00pm
Crescent B 311 W Peltason Dr, Irvine, CA 92697

8:00am

Quiet Room
Chill out in peace and quiet! No talking, meeting groups, or phone calls in this room please.





Thursday October 3, 2019 8:00am - 7:00pm
Crescent A 311 W Peltason Dr, Irvine, CA 92697

8:05am

All-Day Bus Schedule October 3, 2019
CLS is providing bus transportation to UC Irvine from the Hyatt Regency John Wayne Newport Beach. In order to arrive before the 9:00 AM keynote, please, wait outside the Hyatt at 8:00 AM to secure a spot in one of the three buses departing between 8:05 and 8:15 AM. A CLS staff member will assist you to board the bus. Upon arrival to campus, signage will direct you to the UCI Student Center.

Bus service is provided all day.

Thursday Oct 3 - Hyatt Departure to UCI
8:00 AM - Meet up in front of hotel to board the bus.
9:05 AM
9:25 AM
9:45 AM
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3:15 PM
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Thursday Oct 3 -  UCI Departure to Hyatt 
9:35 AM
9:55 AM
10:15 AM
10:35 AM
10:55 AM
11:15 AM
11:35 AM
11:55 AM
12:15 PM
12:35 PM
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Thursday October 3, 2019 8:05am - 7:45pm

9:00am

Fireside Chat with Henry Jenkins
The Connected Learning Summit kicks off with a Q&A with youth activists Jessica Riestra from March for Our Lives and Justin Scott from Students Deserve, Black Lives Matter , hosted by Henry Jenkins, Provost Professor of Communication, Journalism, Cinematic Arts and Education at the University of Southern California. Join us for an inspiring conversation on the power of youth to work for change in the world around them and the challenges and rewards of youth activism.


Speakers
HJ

Henry Jenkins

Provost Professor of Communication, Journalism, Ci, USC


Thursday October 3, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:00am

AM Coffee and Tea
Thursday October 3, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am
Pacific Ballroom Foyer 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

3D and Immersive Learning
Designing in 360 Degrees: Cueing the Player for Immersive Learning
Larysa Nadolny, Kristina M Tank
Previous research on cueing has focused on multimedia environments where the information is within the player’s field of vision. Virtual reality environments have the unique challenge in that information is located in all directions around the player. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of cueing on patterns of engagement within a 360° image. Exploratory data analysis was used to examine 3337 user interactions. Although there was an overall decrease in clicks from front to back in all groups, the text and audio cueing groups more frequently selected items behind the field of view. These findings support the use of cueing as a way to direct the player’s attention to the back of the virtual environment.

Education Through Navigation: Exploring Wayfinding in Mission HydroSci
Alex Urban, Wenyi Lu, Hao He, Joseph Griffin
Popular 3D educational video games increasingly incorporate vast amounts of content and limited direct instruction. This exploratory study investigates player navigation in order to determine how wayfinding aids and level design impact the interaction with embedded instructional content. To investigate player behavior, participants completed navigational tasks within a larger usability study of an environmental science video game, Mission HydroSci. This study adopts a mixed-method approach, including: (a) demographic questionnaires and geographic skills assessment, (b) virtual participant observation, (c) game logs of user actions, and (d) analysis of eye-tracking data related to in-game navigational aids. We found that participant self-reported average weekly gameplay, affect toward science, and spatial orientation as well distance estimation experience positively correlated to player interaction with some wayfinding aids and the speed in which participants completed tasks with and without explicit navigational cues. In addition to these demographic correlations, in-game player movement and visual fixation duration present differences that may be valuable for future behavioral clustering. We use these results to discuss future research implications for 3D virtual learning environments.

Speakers
avatar for Larysa Nadolny

Larysa Nadolny

Associate Professor, Iowa State University
Dr. Larysa Nadolny is an associate professor in the Iowa State University School of Education (SOE) and Human Computer Interaction (HCI) associated faculty member. Her publications include research on motivation and achievement in virtual worlds, augmented reality, and game-based... Read More →
avatar for Alex Urban

Alex Urban

University of Missouri
JG

Joseph Griffin

University of Missouri


Thursday October 3, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Doheny Beach B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

Strategies for Collective Action and Impact
Mobilizing for Creative Learning: A Citywide, Ecosystem Approach
Marijke Hecht, Mac Howison, Esohe Osai, Thomas Akiv
a

What is creative learning? What children get to experience it? How can we engineer the learning landscape for more equitable access and opportunity? In this talk, we describe a research-philanthropy partnership between a research team from the University of Pittsburgh and The Heinz Endowments that worked together to address these questions and build momentum around creative learning in Pittsburgh, PA. Throughout the process we intentionally focused on equity and access, with the explicit aim to avoid replication of systemic inequities. The talk will focus on both the process we used for this collaborative project, as well as highlights of what we have learned so far about our local creative learning ecosystem. In our presentation we will describe how researchers and funders worked together with key stakeholders to define creative learning locally and consider how creative learning fits into the local and national landscape. We will also share a key early component of this work—a project that used regional surveys, focus groups, and site assessments to map and model the current regional opportunities and supports available for creative learning.

Connected Learning in Rural Areas: Strategies for Implementation
Lance Simpson, Linda Braun


Public Libraries and other similar third-space community organizations have been ideal adopters of the Connected Learning framework. Dedicated to providing access and equitable learning opportunities, these institutions serve an important role in providing out-of-school education for children and teens. Through work with the IMLS funded Transforming Teen Services: Train the Trainer project with COSLA and YALSA, library practitioners on the state and local levels have provided training around Connected Learning, Computational Thinking, and Child and Youth Development to library staff across their respective states (Alabama, Maine, Minnesota, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin) through a year long pilot program that will soon be administered nationally. While the project’s purpose has been to increase access to support and professional development opportunities, it has generated great discussion around the following research problem: How do we deploy the Connected Learning framework as a viable means for shaping in- and out-of-school learning in the rural United States?

Rural areas provide unique challenges in meeting the educational needs of children and teens, especially as it relates to Connected Learning, including a lack of public transportation, access to high speed internet, opportunities for engaged learning out of school, and more. Library staff from Alabama and Minnesota along side the principal investigator for the project will provide observations from the their respective states including needs presented to them at the state and local level. This team will facilitate a discussion to develop strategies to further inform current efforts to address the needs in a sustainable, replicable way.

Bridges or Circuitry?: Changing How We Think and Talk About Connected Learning Through Strategic Frame Analysis
Kevin Levay, Kiley Sobel


To prepare for a 21st-century workforce, students are developing skills in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). But STEM learning doesn’t only happen in the classroom; it also happens at home, in libraries, museums, and afterschool centers. Informal settings like these are essential to learning, yet members of the public don’t fully appreciate the value of STEM learning outside of school or understand the need to connect the learning that happens in different environments. How can advocates make a stronger case for connecting STEM education across settings? Through the Families Learning Across Boundaries (FamLAB) Project, the Joan Ganz Cooney Center and FrameWorks Institute are attempting to shift how the adults in children’s lives—parents, teachers, after-school clubs and daycare providers, librarians, and other community-based organization professionals—think about where and when children’s STEM learning occurs. In this Connected Learning Summit Showcase, we will describe the process and findings of our research on how to improve public understanding of STEM learning, and ongoing efforts in training key leaders in education, policy, advocacy, and the press/media to effectively communicate with constituents. We will also share an online toolkit based on the research that provides strategies for communicating about connecting STEM learning environments, and is available at the following link: https://www.frameworksinstitute.org/toolkits/wiring-up/.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Braun

Linda Braun

Learning Consultant, LEO/YALSA
Linda W. Braun is a Learning Consultant with LEO. She works with educational institutions across the United States to design and deliver quality learning experiences for youth, families and professional staff. She manages large-scale projects Future Ready with the Library and Transforming... Read More →
TA

Thomas Akiva

Associate Professor, University of Pittsburgh School of Education
LS

Lance Simpson

Tuscaloosa Public Library
KL

Kevin Levay

Research Fellow, FrameWorks Institute
avatar for Kiley Sobel

Kiley Sobel

Research Scientist, The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop
avatar for Marijke Hecht

Marijke Hecht

Graduate Student Researcher, University of Pittsburgh School of Education
perpetually curious learning ecologist & urban nature geek
avatar for Mac Howison

Mac Howison

Program Officer for Creative Learning, The Heinz Endowments
EO

Esohe Osai

Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh School of Education


Thursday October 3, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Doheny Beach A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

Digital Diversity: How Social, Cultural and Real Life Circumstances Shape Youth Digital Media Practices
While we often think of “digital youth” as sharing common experiences, research is increasingly highlighting the diversity of youth experiences online. Understanding the differences between youth digital participation is as important as understanding how digital technologies have shaped a generation. This emphasis on diversity and difference is particularly important given trends towards political polarization, the proliferation of platforms and affinity networks, and with higher-cost and higher-bandwidth forms of digital engagement such as virtual reality, augmented reality, and 5G networks on the horizon. A broader palette of forms of online participation and affiliation offer new avenues for validating interests and identities for diverse youth. At the same time, these trends open up risks of new kinds of digital participation gaps, echo chambers, and political polarization. This symposium will draw highlight research from two recent books from the NYU Press “Connected Youth and Digital Futures” series that showcase digital diversity: Affinity Online How Connection and Shared Interest Fuel Learning and The Digital Edge: How Black and Latino Youth Navigate Digital Inequality to explore the varied cultural, social, and real life circumstances inflecting the digital practices of youth. How do social, familial, economic, cultural, political factors shape youth digital participation, for example? How do diverse forms of online affiliation and participation support youth agency, voice, and learning? The symposium will feature authors from the two books, Craig Watkins, Katie Salen, and Mimi Ito, and be moderated by Henry Jenkins.

Speakers
HJ

Henry Jenkins

Provost Professor of Communication, Journalism, Ci, USC
avatar for S. Craig Watkins

S. Craig Watkins

Professor, The University of Texas at Austin
S. Craig Watkins studies young people’s social and digital media behaviors. He is a Professor at the University of Texas, Austin, in the department of Radio-Television-Film. Craig is also a Faculty Fellow for the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement at the University of... Read More →
avatar for Mizuko Ito

Mizuko Ito

Director, University of California, Irvine
KS

Katie Salen

University of California, Irvine


Thursday October 3, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

Dungeons & Dragons, Distributed
This symposium explores the diverse learning pathways and movements different players take around the tabletop roleplaying game Dungeons & Dragons (D&D). We utilize a conceptual framework we call distributed teaching and learning systems (DTALS) which complements and extends the Connected Learning framework by emphasizing the range of designed and emergent teaching resources learners encounter around complex problem spaces like D&D, and how movement across these contexts (sites, people, time) is crucial in understanding the deep and uniquely shaped learning that occurs for different learners. During the session, we will include audience participants in a streamlined D&D play session to highlight multiple perspectives for analysis and to highlight key features of the DTALS framework, including how the game master and players negotiate and customize learning pathways to fit their specific needs and interests. The session design includes the use of designed teaching resources (game manuals, game master knowledge) and “planted” resources that player-participants may discover; we will also invite them to utilize tools and resources at their disposal (internet browsers, Twitter, other audience members, etc.). Each of these resources connect to the D&D activity and form a network of people and things that participants may (or may not) use, uniquely shaped and enacted for each player. Ultimately, this session will highlight the role of learners as co-designers and the critical but often underexamined role of teaching across contexts in order to expand the important insights of the Connected Learning research agenda.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly M Tran

Kelly M Tran

Assistant Professor, High Point University
PhD Student at Arizona State University.
JH

Jeffrey Holmes

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
EA

Earl Aguilera

Assistant Professor, California State University, Fresno


Thursday October 3, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Doheny Beach C/D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

Three Approaches to Exploring Twin Cities PBS Educational Game Telemetry
Current technology allows researchers to collect gameplay data with an unprecedented level of resolution. Mouse clicks, state transitions, and other user interactions (both inside and outside of the game) can be recorded, stored, and analyzed. With access to this wealth of data it is important to determine which data are useful, and how to make use of this data in ways that will ultimately inform and improve student learning? This symposium explores three approaches used to collect, visualize, and interpret telemetry produced by students playing a game created for Hero Elementary, an upcoming educational television show and suite of educational activities developed by Twin Cities PBS’s (TPT) Ready to Learn program. This session will be comprised of three parts during which the authors will summarize their role in the project, and their approach to collecting or analyzing gameplay data.

Speakers
avatar for Betsy McCarthy

Betsy McCarthy

Senior Researcher, STEM
Helping developers create and test educational games for formal and informal education environments.
MC

Melissa Cheung

Senior Project Manager, WestEd
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Digital Program Manager - Ready To Learn, Twin Cities Public Television
Dennis Ramirez is the Digital Program Manager at Twin Cities Public Television, and an award winning educational game designer. Dennis is interested in how new technologies are used in, and out, of the classroom to support learning. His main area of research focuses on how failure... Read More →
avatar for Momoko Hayakawa

Momoko Hayakawa

Researcher, Twin Cities PBS
Momo Hayakawa is a Education Research and Analytics Associate for the Ready to Learn (RTL) project at Twin Cities PBS (TPT). She oversees RTL’s external evaluation conducted by WestEd and manages the design, implementation, and evaluation of the program. Her research interests lie... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Emerald Bay D/E 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

Adaptive, Personalized Learning for Little Engineers: STEM Play With the Cat in the Hat Builds That App
This session invites the audience to go, go, go on an adventure with The Cat in the Hat through an in-depth look at the development of The Cat in the Hat Builds That app, an adaptive, playful learning experience based on the PBS KIDS series, The Cat in the Hat Knows A Lot About That! Developed under a Ready To Learn grant to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS through the U.S. Department of Education, this app is designed to engage preschoolers in science inquiry and engineering design, promote positive mindsets and attitudes in science and engineering, while teaching core science concepts and practices. Observing, documenting, building, improving, reflecting- these are all actions that we purposely designed play experiences around. Second was to create an adaptive and personalized learning experience. This app empowers preschoolers through personalized play and guides preschoolers through adaptive play, where the games tailor to an individual learner’s progress. Lastly, (pending research availability) we will discuss the multiple research agendas we are conducting to help us see the overall efficacy impact of the app through its inquiry & engineering curriculum and approach, adaptive and personalized learning and lastly, how it might impact a preschoolers overall view on science.

Speakers
AJ

Abby Jenkins

Senior Director, Content, PBS KIDS
SS

Sara Sweetman

Assistant Professor, University of Rhode Island
JB

Jennifer Borland

Director of Research Programs, Rockman Et Al


Thursday October 3, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Pacific Ballroom A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

Unboxing Games: The Many Uses of Europa Universalis IV
Despite the prevalence of games used for teaching and learning, many barriers still exist that constrain how teachers and researchers utilize games. An unexhaustive list includes the lack of teacher buy-in and experience, time restrictions, and appropriate resources to facilitate classroom gameplay. As a result, the effectiveness of using games in classrooms remain case specific. This session aims to describe multiple entry points for teachers and researchers to operationalize games beyond just gameplay. Specifically, Europa Universalis IV and its associated affinity spaces will be used to show how game map modes can be immersive and interactive, customizable and personalized, and engage students in learning without requiring gameplay. Europa Universalis IV is a historical grand strategy game that has been previously studied in high school and undergraduate classrooms for teaching world history. The player controls a nation from 1444-1800 through the age of discovery, reformation, absolutism, and revolutions. Europa Universalis IV also provides the player with options to start at different time points and to create customizable nations. Additionally, the game has dozens of map modes that allow a player to interact with the world from many perspectives, including political, diplomatic, economic, and geographic. This demonstration will provide an overview of gameplay, how to use its many interactive maps and various game mechanics with and without gameplay, as well as providing links to additional online resources. The objective of this session is to advance the affordances of games by demonstrating the many ways games can act as educational tools.

Speakers
MK

Magdalene Kate Moy

PhD Candidate, Drexel University


Thursday October 3, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Pacific Ballroom A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

Amplifying Youth Voices Through Video Production: An Interactive Workshop
In the current media climate, where news sources are deemed “fake” and where youth are often portrayed in a negative light, it is essential that we provide youth with the space to share their stories. As youth recognize that their peers, citizens, and stakeholders are ready to listen, they can fight negative stereotypes and reframe themselves as passionate agents of change. Our interactive symposium scans the world of youth digital video journalism, providing first hand experience with curriculum, tools, and programs designed to increase critical media literacy skills and civic engagement. As our organizations continue to expand capacity and range through creating new digital tools and bridging new communities, we offer this symposium as an opportunity for conference attendees to explore innovative moves in digital journalism and propose methods for continuous improvement. The symposium will begin with a lightning round pitch from three youth video production programs, PBS Newshour Student Reporting Labs, Wisconsin Public Television and the Click Youth Media program, and KQED and Above The Noise. In their pitch, each organization will provide an overview of their program and share a current programmatic challenge. Attendees will then choose two groups to visit during the second part of the symposium. The lead from each group will engage attendees in a problem solving dialogue around the programmatic challenges, pooling attendees’ expertise for meaningful solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Megan Monday

Megan Monday

Executive Producer, Wisconsin Public Television
avatar for Jessie Nixon

Jessie Nixon

Doctoral Student, UW-Madison
EE

Elis Estrada

Director, Student Reporting Labs, NewsHour


Thursday October 3, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Emerald Bay C 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

How to Develop Digital Citizenship Dispositions
How do you teach students to use technology responsibly to learn, create, and participate? How do educators teach students to avoid the risks and harness the rewards of digital media? Working with schools and educators over the past decade, Project Zero (PZ) at the Harvard Graduate School of Education collaborated with Common Sense Education to apply their research on media in kids’ lives into a free K-12 curriculum for schools on digital citizenship. The latest research from PZ reveals that digital citizenship needs to be grounded in pedagogical strategies that support not only skills, but dispositions, or “habits of mind.” Dispositions are ongoing tendencies that guide thinking and behavior. Just as we teach kids to "stop, look, and listen" when crossing the street, dispositions help guide behavior in their everyday life.
In January 2019, Common Sense Education and PZ published a research report in which they identified a set of five core dispositions of digital citizenship young people should embody in all domains of life: in school, on the sports field, and in their communities as well as on Snapchat, on Instagram, and in Fortnite. In 2018 to 2019, Common Sense Education is updating their curriculum designed to develop these dispositions through a set of “promising pedagogies” including thinking routines, authentic activities, and digital dilemmas. In this workshop, participants will get a brief overview of the five digital citizenship dispositions and core topics of the Digital Citizenship Curriculum, and try out a series of activities using promising pedagogies designed to develop these dispositions, which they can apply in their own work with young people.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Mendoza

Kelly Mendoza

Sr. Director, Education Programs, Common Sense Education
Kelly Mendoza oversees digital citizenship education content and strategy for Common Sense Education, including the Digital Citizenship Curriculum, interactive games, and online professional development. Her goal is to create curricula and programs that help students think critically... Read More →
avatar for Carrie James

Carrie James

Principal Investigator, Harvard Project Zero
Carrie James is a Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Project Zero, and a Lecturer on Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research explores young people’s digital, moral, and civic lives.


Thursday October 3, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Emerald Bay A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

Making Spaces: Insights and Tools for Shifting Pedagogy and Practice at Scale
Making Spaces: Expanding Maker Education Across the Nation, is a program partnership between Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh and Maker Education Initiative, with support from Google, which aims to develop a national strategy to sustainably integrate making into schools across the country in order to shift pedagogy and practice. This is done through three primary mechanisms: professional development, community engagement and networked support at local, regional and national levels. The program employs a model where multiple participating schools partner with a nearby regional hub, such as a museum or science center. The network currently encompasses 21 hubs and over 200 schools.

This workshop will present a brief overview of the Making Spaces program and then engage participants in several tools and resources used in this program. We will discuss how these tools can, and have, been used for practice, evaluation, and research in museums, libraries, and schools around the country. Our hands-on activities will allow participants to practice and adapt these tools for use in their own contexts going forward. During this workshop, we will also explore the theory of change behind the real stories of programmatic impact, including the most successful models, modes, and elements of professional development and sustained support offered by hubs to create lasting and valued change in their communities.

We will conclude with time for questions, open discussion, and intentional thinking about next steps.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Brahms

Lisa Brahms

Director of Learning & Research, Children's Museum of Pittsburgh
Lisa Brahms, Ph.D. is Director of Learning and Research at Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, as well as a visiting researcher with the University of Pittsburgh Center for Learning in Out of School Environments (UPCLOSE).  Lisa earned her PhD in Learning Sciences and Policy at the... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Chang

Stephanie Chang

Director of Impact, Maker Ed
Stephanie Chang is the Director of Impact at Maker Ed, having spent 5 years previously leading and designing Maker Ed’s program and project offerings for educators and institutions around the country. Her current work focuses on evaluating the impact and value of programmatic efforts... Read More →
avatar for Alison Bank

Alison Bank

Learning & Research Project Manager, Children's Museum of Pittsburgh
Alison Bank is the Learning & Research Project Manager at Children's Museum of Pittsburgh (CMP). She first began working with CMP as a research associate for the University of Pittsburgh Center for Learning in Out of School Environments (UPCLOSE). Since joining the CMP team, she manages... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Emerald Bay B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:15am

AM Break
Thursday October 3, 2019 11:15am - 11:30am
Pacific Ballroom Foyer 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Hall of Failure
Learning From Mistakes
Bill Shribm
an

Digital educational projects typically need proposals and pitches. Failure is not typically mentioned in proposals and pitches: it’s not a great selling point. And yet, as we know, failure in digital development is inevitable.
Bill Shribman, Senior Executive Producer and Director of Digital Partnerships produces a rich array VR, AP, mobile web games, apps and skills at WGBH Educational Foundation in Boston.

In an honest and self-deprecating presentation, Bill will share how smart development and transparent processes can effectively bridge the gap between funder expectations and the realities of digital development.

This involves a willingness to embrace risk and to include stakeholders – especially where one might otherwise choose not to. This can turn failures into valuable data that inform and improve most products, most of the time. The rest of the time is best summed up here by two noted experts in failure:

Dudley Moore: “Do you feel you've learnt by your mistakes here?”

Peter Cook: “I think I have, yes, and I think I can probably repeat them almost perfectly.”

Great to Good: When Time and Design Conspire Against Maximizing Learning
Leigh Peake


At CL2018 we (Gulf of Maine Research Institute) reported on the relaunch of our informal science learning experience, LabVenture, where we host ~70% of Maine’s 5th/6th grade cohort annually in our marine research lab for a 2.5-hour exploration of ecosystem complexity. Funded by NASA, the renovated experience features technology-enabled, data-rich, localized climate learning experiences that combine global data sets (e.g. sea surface temperature), local data sets (e.g., lobster landings), and multitouch technology to enable students to investigate the impacts of climate change in the Gulf of Maine. Post-launch, it was apparent that the length and pace of the experience, combined with key design decisions, were conspiring against our effort to achieve student learning outcomes. At CL2019 we’ll report on the significant adjustments to the program that emerged as necessary after launch. We’ll describe our process of integrating observations and perspectives from informal educators, researchers/evaluators, and learning designers and the necessity of embracing the messiness of launching a complex program. This tale of traveling from great to good (and back to great) includes lessons on the limitations of user testing, the integration of research and practitioner voices, the scramble to fund adjustments when you spent most of your dollars on the launch version, and the comfort of reminding ourselves that no children were being harmed as we made our way through this process.

A PSA Nightmare: Good Intentions Gone Wrong
Lisa Casteneda
Tim Han


As researchers, we are always looking for new ways to share ideas about our topic-area: education. As part of this effort, we decided to team up with a local school who specializes in dyslexic students to share findings about dyslexia in the narrative structure of a PSA. We attempted to bridge the gap between research, education and emotion and it went poorly. At the heart of our mistake was understanding how to communicate feedback effectively. We found that when collaborating with many folks about a topic that is not only scientifically interesting, but also emotionally intense, it is difficult to capture all the elements one hopes in a 2 minute PSA. What we were used to doing as we co-wrote papers or worked on presentations was much more challenging to do with people outside our core network, and in the more visual and emotional medium of film. Throughout this project we were tasked with connecting the ideas from the school to the actors and film team, all of whom had their own thoughts and experiences with dyslexia. All of these elements put us out of our comfort zone, but at the helm of a project we all felt passionate about! Come hear about our vision, our mistakes (many of which had to do with the fine art of specific feedback), and how we would do things differently (which we ultimately did) in our attempts to leave the research publication world for that of the public service announcement.

Speakers
avatar for Bill Shribman

Bill Shribman

Senior Executive Producer, WGBH
I make games for kids of all ages for mobile web, native apps, AR, VR, facial recognition, and voice skills. I also produce animation. My current work at WGBH is on original, digital projects with and for PBS, NASA, Microsoft, Amazon, and Harvard University, spanning early literacy... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Castaneda

Lisa Castaneda

Co-founder & CEO, foundry10
Foundry10 is led by an experienced educator named Lisa Castaneda. Lisa has a Master’s Degree in Education, a Bachelor’s of Science in Psychology, and over 10 years of experience teaching in K-8 schools, as well as experience working in several other fields. Lisa created foundry10... Read More →
avatar for Leigh Peake

Leigh Peake

Chief Education Officer, Gulf of Maine Research Institute
GMRI is focused at the intersection of informal and formal learning, working primarily in the spaces of data literacy and climate literacy. Our two statewide programs include a citizen science program and a data-rich, tech-enabled informal science learning experience. Talk to me about... Read More →
TH

Tim Han

Film and Content Developer, foundry10


Thursday October 3, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Doheny Beach C/D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Social Contexts for Learning CS
An Asset-Based Approach to CS Equity: Ethnographic Research on Google igniteCS
Setareh Mahmoudi, Mizuko Ito, Kurt Squire
The field of computer science (CS) struggles to expand the representation of women and minorities. To help strengthen a sense of belonging and confidence in their field for these underrepresented groups, Google launched igniteCS, an educational mentorship program run by undergraduate CS students in the US and Canada. This paper presents a qualitative study of iCS which found the program exemplifies an “asset-based” approach that grows out of the unique strengths and interests of URGs. The program’s peer support and leadership opportunities led to significant positive outcomes for undergraduates most at risk of dropping out of CS programs. These positive outcomes included: (1) psychological safety, (2) peer relationships in CS, and (3) identity transformation. The key design features that supported these outcomes included: (1) validating and sponsoring the strengths of youth from URGs, (2) shared and meaningful purpose, (3) supporting student autonomy and initiative, and (4) peer-to-peer and near-peer mentorship.

Social Network Analysis for Connected Learning
Carolina Rodeghiero
Social Network Analysis (SNA) is applied to social media and online communities to show specially how its relations and social capital influences a social network in many fields. This paper shows how SNA with Connected Learning (CL) principles can be used to analyze how people, particularly kids and teens, learn from virtual communities when they have online interactions with each other. By CL I understand the one that comes from three learning principles: is interest-based, academically oriented, and peer-supported; and three design principles: it’s production centered, it has shared purposes and it’s openly-networked. CL also relates to non-school and non-formal educational sectors, like the one I use here: the Scratch community. Scratch is a free programming environment, language and community created for learners from all ages to build media like games and storytelling through coding. Beyond the programming tool itself, Scratch offers discussion forums, studios, collaborative commands, and specific features for educators. This investigation uses data from interactions in public forums of Scratch and presents a method framework to analyze its CL through SNA.

The Responsibility That Comes With Prestige: Top Computer Science Programs and Broadening Participation
Fay Cobb Payton, Matthew Hoagland
In this study, we investigate whether resources from top ranked university computer science (CS) programs trickled down to the high school level. Advanced Placement Computer Science exams are used as a means to measure participation in the CS field at the high school level. This opens up numerous questions about why is this considered a success measure to predict CS participation when access issues remain. Based on our findings, we provide implications regarding computing pathways, educational equity and existing learning cases that provide context for the issues associated with CS underserved and underrepresentation groups.

Speakers
avatar for Carolina Rodeghiero

Carolina Rodeghiero

PhD Researcher, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
FC

Fay Cobb Payton

Professor/University Faculty School, NC State University
avatar for Mizuko Ito

Mizuko Ito

Director, University of California, Irvine
MH

Matthew Hoagland

Graduate Student, North Carolina State University


Thursday October 3, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Doheny Beach B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Youth Voice and Connected Journalism
Adaptable, Scalable, Measurable: Using Story Builder to Create Healthcare America, an Immersive Newsgame
Juli James, Sara Champlin


Story Builder is an interactive game design platform created to serve the ever-changing, complicated challenges of communicating news to the general public.

In our fast-paced society, journalists must cover a variety of complex topics with a short turnaround. Additionally, it is critically important that general audiences can understand, interpret, and make use of the information presented through news outlets. Tools that support journalists’ endeavors to disseminate information quickly - as well as immerse the public in ways that help increase their understanding of critical news content - are needed.

In this project we developed a “newsgame” on a topic that is challenging for readers and journalists, but one for which news coverage can help educate diverse audiences - health insurance.

This project showcases the benefits of the Story Builder platform, including the ability to make updates to game content quickly, such as in response to breaking news. The Story Builder is also designed to be used by any audience, including journalists who may not have programming backgrounds. Finally, through a second iteration, we tested an integrated survey function, which allows researchers to examine the cognitive and affective outcomes of the game.

In this Showcase we will demonstrate what we did to create a game on a hotly-debated topic, why this matters for society, and how others can use Story Builder for games on other critical topics.

Youth Voice: Expanding the Boundaries of ‘Public’ in Public Media
Denise Sauerteig


Youth voices have been taking and holding center stage in the national consciousness. In December 2017, The California Sunday Magazine published an all-teen issue--stories written by and about life as a teenager today. In 2018, The New York Times announced they were looking for student writers to “explore issues that you and your friends would like to see in The Times.” And in the wake of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida and the subsequent March For Our Lives movement, student voices have moved to the forefront of social media and broadcast media. KQED is broadening the concept of ‘the public’ in public media, breaking through traditional boundaries and expanding youth voice on the airwaves. KQED’s Youth Takeover began in April 2018 with a week of youth contributors from classrooms around the Bay Area taking over the airwaves. It expanded in April 2019 with educator professional development on media making and workforce development for youth on journalism media creation. This showcase will present process and outcomes from the first two Youth Takeovers and discuss ways to scale up the work, while also engaging audiences in helping us redefine ‘public’ and how youth voice can continue to reach mass audiences.

Ensuring Civic Engagement and Integrity in Youth Media Programming
Jeff McCarter, Mai McDonald, Lee Edwards, Armani Baker


As the landscape of media and journalism constantly changes and we face unique local, national and global issues, Free Spirit Media is using digital media and community reporting as a medium to transform society. Learn how Free Spirit Media’s hands-on curriculum, reporters and media makers are activating communities, encouraging civic engagement and fostering responsible media creation and consumption. Take a look at the many ways that Free Spirit Media is empowering the next generation of civically engaged creators and leaders.

Hear directly from staff and program participants about how the organizational structure and leveling up process allows youth and young adults to excel within programs and establish careers in creative industries. See how heightened media skills, high-quality production, expert interviewing and application of advanced technologies has helped youth make an impact through out Chicago and receive national recognition, including an Emmy for Outstanding Achievement for Public Service Announcement.

Gain more specific insights and curricular strategies from FSM’s community newsroom, the Real Chi. View how participants are constantly pushing the boundaries of creative expression and impact journalism. Learn how to incorporate solutions based and project based learning in youth and media programming. Take a moment to be part of the actual media creation and journalistic process by refining the skills involved in storytelling, pitching a new idea, interviewing subjects, and preserving integrity in reporting. Use workshop takeaways in areas of civic and community engagement, inclusion, youth voice, equity, equality and inclusion to enrich and inform your practices.

Speakers
avatar for Juli James

Juli James

Lecturer, University of North Texas
DS

Denise Sauerteig

Learning & Evaluation Manager, KQED
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Lee Edwards

Program Coordinator, The Real Chi, Free Spirit Media
avatar for Jeff McCarter

Jeff McCarter

Founder & Executive Director, Free Spirit Media
MM

Maia McDonald

Free Spirit Media
AB

Armani Baker

Free Spirit Media


Thursday October 3, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Doheny Beach A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Assessment in Library Makerspaces: Opportunities and Challenges
More and more libraries are offering learning experiences through making and makerspaces. As this momentum continues--as well as that for hands-on learning experiences in general in libraries--practitioners need ways to strategies, tools and frameworks to assess learning and engagement in maker-based learning experiences for a variety of reasons, such as program/practice improvement. This symposium brings together individual presentations of researchers and practitioners designing assessments with library staff for work in their makerspaces as well as presenters addressing national level perspectives. The audience participants will gain understanding of the strengths and challenges of three specific projects as well as engage in discussion with others about this work.

Speakers
avatar for Jordan M. Smith

Jordan M. Smith

Librarian & Manager of the Launch Pad Makerspace, Buffalo & Erie County Public Library
Jordan M. Smith is a public librarian who serves as the manager of the Launch Pad Makerspace at Buffalo & Erie County Public Library's Downtown Central Library. His work currently focuses on providing free public access to and training on technology for creative purposes, from basic... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Millerjohn

Rebecca Millerjohn

Teaching and Learning Librarian, Madison Public Library
Rebecca Millerjohn is the youth services librarian with the Bubbler at Madison Public Library. Rebecca is a previous six year classroom working in Houston, Texas and at Gary Comer College Prep on Chicago’s South Side. A graduate of UW’s School of Library and Information Studies... Read More →
avatar for Ephran Ramirez

Ephran Ramirez

Lead STEM Mentor - YOUmedia, Chicago Public Library
I'm interested in the intersections of science education and social justice.Science should be made accessible to all youth, regardless of race, class, gender, orientation, etc. Finding ways to eliminate the barriers in science education is crucial to our success as a whole and to... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Brahms

Lisa Brahms

Director of Learning & Research, Children's Museum of Pittsburgh
Lisa Brahms, Ph.D. is Director of Learning and Research at Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, as well as a visiting researcher with the University of Pittsburgh Center for Learning in Out of School Environments (UPCLOSE).  Lisa earned her PhD in Learning Sciences and Policy at the... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Chang

Stephanie Chang

Director of Impact, Maker Ed
Stephanie Chang is the Director of Impact at Maker Ed, having spent 5 years previously leading and designing Maker Ed’s program and project offerings for educators and institutions around the country. Her current work focuses on evaluating the impact and value of programmatic efforts... Read More →
avatar for Eric Reyes

Eric Reyes

Digital Media Coordinator, Chicago Public Library
Eric Reyes works in the Teen Services/YOUmedia Department of the Chicago Public Library. Prior to joining CPL, Eric worked in education with formerly incarcerated adults, as a recording instructor, and as a facilitator/engineer at StoryCorps Chicago. Eric has a MA in Sociology and... Read More →
avatar for Peter Wardrip

Peter Wardrip

Assistant Professor of STEAM Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Peter Wardrip is an Assistant Professor of STEAM Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research focuses on informal/formal learning collaborations, professional learning for educators, formative assessment and making as a learning process. Peter earned his PhD in Learning... Read More →
avatar for Caitlin Martin

Caitlin Martin

Design and Research, CKMartin Consulting
avatar for Vishesh Kumar

Vishesh Kumar

Doctoral Candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Thursday October 3, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay D/E 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Developing a Youth Esports Federation: A Case Study of Connected Learning in Action
This symposium offers a view into both the theory and practice of NASEF, an esports organization for youth, highlighting ways in which a mission-driven organization found synergies with designers, educators, and researchers committed to reimagining connected learning in the context of esports. NASEF is both a sports program and a model for the design of connected learning environments. The league meets students where they are by tapping into a gaming interest. It helps youth connect this interest to relationships and opportunities through a near-peer coaching program, school-based clubs, associations with professional esports organizations, and a standards-based curriculum. Most critically, it was designed with the understanding that youth learn and develop an interest over time, across settings, and in partnership with others. Founding organizations include the Samueli Foundation, Orange County Department of Education, University of California at Irvine (UCI), OC STEM Initiative, and Connected Camps. Participating groups from UCI include UCI Esports, the Connected Learning Lab, the School of Information and Computer Science, and the School of Engineering. Collaboration among these various stakeholders has helped grow the league into a thriving platform linking researchers, educators, parents, esports players, game companies, and sponsors together in pursuit of genuinely engaging, resilient, and relevant learning opportunities for youth. From its founding mission, to its design, and associated research agenda, the federation has shown a deep commitment to systemically supporting youth in pursuing their interests, developing meaningful relationships, and offering access to opportunity.

Speakers
avatar for Jessamyn Acebes

Jessamyn Acebes

League Operations Coordinator, North America Scholastic Esports Federation
avatar for Tom Turner

Tom Turner

Executive Director, Educational Services, Orange County Department of Education
I currently serve as the Executive Director of Educational Services with the Orange County Department of Education. In this role, I regularly interact with site administrators and district leadership in implementing professional learning and program development throughout Orange County... Read More →
KS

Katie Salen

University of California, Irvine
CS

Constance Steinkuehler

Professor, Informatics, University of California Irvine


Thursday October 3, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Pacific Ballroom A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Design Games: A Playful Approach to Cultivating Designerly Thinking
Steve Jobs famously said that realizing we can change and influence the world around us—realizing the importance of design—is perhaps the most important thing. In this workshop, we will introduce the concept of Design games, a playful approach to cultivating designerly thinking and creative collaboration that we developed as part of the NSF-funded Play in the Making project. Design games engage learners in collectively playing and modifying (or “fixing”) incomplete or unplayable analog games, with the goal of enhancing appreciation of games as designed objects, capacities as potential designers in a variety of settings, and the nature of design as a complex social activity. Design games are an alternative to involving learners in creating completely new games, a process that can often be too time-consuming or challenging for learners with little or no formal design experience. Design games can also be used as an introduction to design thinking, for example in maker environments, or as preparation for other game design activities, including the creation of digital games. In this session, we will present the concept of Design games, involve participants in playing a Design game, and demonstrate strategies for encouraging critical reflection on their Design game experience. Following this interactive experience, we will facilitate discussion of how Design games might be adapted for use in different educational settings for various purposes. We welcome educators with any level of experience to join us for a playful, team-oriented, and thought-provoking workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Elisabeth Gee

Elisabeth Gee

Professor, Arizona State University
I'm the Associate Director of the Center for Games & Impact at ASU, and co-directing the Play2Connect initiative with Dr. Sinem Siyahhan at Cal State-San Marcos. I'm interested in gender and gaming, game-based affinity spaces, and intergenerational play.
SS

Sinem Siyahhan

Associate Professor, Cal State San Marcos
Sinem Siyahhan is Associate Director of the CSUSM Center for Research and Engagement in STEM Education. She is an Associate Professor of Educational Technology and Learning Sciences, and a core faculty member in the Educational Leadership Joint Doctoral Program at California State... Read More →
LE

Luis E Perez Cortes

Arizona State University
TK

Taylor Kessner

Research Assistant, Arizona State University


Thursday October 3, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Family & Community Learning: Multigenerational Learning With Public Media
Time is precious for families, so the CPB-PBS Ready To Learn Initiative has developed an innovative model to bring together kids and the caring adults in their lives for fun and engaging learning experiences: PBS KIDS Family & Community Learning (FCL). Inspired by the Family Creative Learning Model developed by Ricarose Roque, PhD, PBS KIDS FCL strives to better engage families with diverse curriculum areas (coding, physical science) through digital content (apps, videos) and hands on learning. Attendees will be introduced to the FCL model before participating in a rapid ideation and prototyping of their own FCL series that can be used to address the myriad learning needs of families. The workshop will close with a guided discussion on how to meaningfully engage kids and adults together in playful learning and how the Connected Learning model can be used to develop FCLs with local partners to support community learning goals. This session will be moderated by engagement staff from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, PBS, and PBS SoCal, who have been deeply engaged in the development, testing, iteration, and distribution of the PBS KIDS FCL model at the local and national levels.

Speakers
avatar for Susana Beltran Grimm

Susana Beltran Grimm

Director, Early Learning, PBS SoCal
Susana has been working in the field of education for the past ten years developing and implementing innovative education initiatives. She currently oversees PBS SoCal’s early learning initiative in technology and media for learning with a focus on parent engagement. Susana has... Read More →
avatar for Devon Steven

Devon Steven

Director, Ready To Learn Community Engagement, Corporation for Public Broadcasting


Thursday October 3, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Fiber Crafting STEM Learning
Fiber crafts have historically played a prominent role in technology innovation. Of note is the Jacquard loom that inspired the use of punch cards in the first programmable computer. We invite participants to explore how these practices can be reclaimed for technology learning and disrupting current STEM designs. In our workshop, you will participate in a make-test gallery walk where you will play with and build onto 9 fiber craft activities, including weaving, sewing, folding, crocheting, and animating, that require the use of key engineering, mathematics, and computer science concepts. These activities use low-cost and low-tech tools and materials, are easily extendable, and can align with personally relevant projects. You will walk away with new ideas and experiences that can be used in classrooms and informal spaces toward the learning and teaching of STEM concepts.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Keune

Anna Keune

Graduate Research Assistant, Indiana University
I am a doctoral candidate in Learning Sciences at Indiana University working with Dr. Kylie Peppler in the Creativity Labs. As a new media artist and designer, she leverages her international experiences across four continents to engage in research that spans across art, technology... Read More →
avatar for Naomi Thompson

Naomi Thompson

Graduate Research Assistant, CEP/CRLT/Creativity Labs
I am a doctoral candidate in Learning Sciences at Indiana University working with Dr. Kylie Peppler. I am interested in the ways crafting and making activities can intersect with and enhance equitable learning in both formal and informal environments.
KA

Kylie A Peppler

University of California, Irvine


Thursday October 3, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay C 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Working Room
Need a space to work? You can come in to answer some email or take a phone call. Please note that this is a group working space.

Thursday October 3, 2019 11:30am - 5:00pm
Pacific Ballroom B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

12:30pm

Lunch
We will provide a hot lunch. Vegan and vegetarian options available.

Thursday October 3, 2019 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

Networked Collaborative Learning
Are Your Students ‘Slack’ers?: Using Cloud-Based Communication to Elicit Peer and Instructor Feedback
Jason R Harron, Ryan Myers, Joan E. Hughes

Slack is a popular cloud-based communication tool that is increasingly being used for
collaborative learning in higher education. This study found that Slack was a viable tool for eliciting peer and instructor feedback as part of a face-to-face interdisciplinary project-based course. Students elicited feedback by directly requesting it from either their peers or instructors. Feedback was also provided via unsolicited advice or recommendation. Positive affirmations from both peers and instructors were the most common form of feedback. Slack provided a space outside of the learning management system (LMS) where students could post photo and video updates about their project while engaging in (a)synchronous communication. Members of the Slack learning community were able to participate at their own pace and could choose whether they wanted to reply outside of traditional working hours.

Designing for Group Flow in Collaborative Cross-Platform Learning Experiences                   
Meredith Thompson, Dan Roy, Philip Tan, Richard Eberhart, Eric Klopfer
Technological resources have expanded the goal of education from individual knowledge acquisition to include the development of critical thinking, communication, and collaboration (Griffin, McCaw, Care, 2012; Van Roekel, 2014). This shift requires a reevaluation of what students learn (e.g. content versus skills) and how students learn in formal education settings (Saavedra & Opfer, 2012). Thus, there is a critical need to find ways to create environments that help students develop conceptual understanding and develop skills essential to the work of the future. At the LAB NAME (removed for anonymity), we are exploring ways to meet this need by developing a cross-platform, collaborative educational game with a conceptual focus on cellular biology and a developmental focus on 21st century skills. In this study, we describe how the game is designed to enable group flow, an optimal state of collaboration when groups have a shared vision, equal ownership and contribution, and effective communication (Sawyer, 2007; Duncan & West, 2018). We examine how well our intended design translates into game experience through an in depth, qualitative pilot study of eight high school teachers. The results of this study suggest that the game design does scaffold some attributes of group flow, while some factors are controlled by the players in the game and are beyond the influence of the game design. This preliminary study contributes to our understanding of how to develop connected learning experiences that incorporate both collaborative and conceptual learning opportunities.

Speakers
avatar for Dan Roy

Dan Roy

Research Scientist, MIT
Dan Roy is a research scientist at the Education Arcade and the Playful Journey Lab. He is the lead game designer on the CLEVR project, inviting high school biology students to explore a cell in VR and collaboratively diagnose and treat a genetic disorder. Dan is also the founder... Read More →
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Eric Klopfer

Professor, MIT
Dr. Eric Klopfer is Professor and Director of the Scheller Teacher Education Program and The Education Arcade at MIT. Klopfer’s research focuses on the development and use of computer games and simulations for building understanding of science and complex systems. His research explores... Read More →
avatar for Jason R Harron

Jason R Harron

PhD Candidate, The University of Texas at Austin
Jason Harron is a Ph.D. candidate at The University of Texas at Austin specializing in Learning Technology. For the past four years he has been working with the UTeach pre-service program as a teaching and graduate research assistant. He helped launch UTeach Maker, a micro-credentialing... Read More →
avatar for Meredith Thompson

Meredith Thompson

Research Scientist and Lecturer, MIT
RM

Ryan Myers

Teaching Fellow, University of Texas at Austin


Thursday October 3, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Doheny Beach B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

Designing Design Experiences
Design, Disrupt and Don't Forget to Play!
Rosanna Lopez


The idea behind the workshop is simple: We ask ourselves how parents, educators, youth facilitators and development practitioners can harness the power of play and games to inspire young people to create positive change in their communities and equip them with the skills to do so.

Utilizing SparkleLAB’s Gamemakers curriculum as our starting point, workshop participants are invited to play, explore possibility and design experiences where young people are given opportunities to immerse themselves in emerging technologies, understand their affordances, define problems and develop projects of impact.

SportsLab – an Online Platform for Connected Learning
James L Larsen, Teon Edwards, Elizabeth Rowe

During the 2018-19 school year, almost a thousand students from thirty middle school classrooms across the US participated in the SportsLab Parkour Shoe Design Challenge, a competition created and hosted on the SportsLab online platform for project-based learning. The competition featured a series of milestones and missions, set in a virtual environment, that provided a storyline and background on sport research, shoe design, and design thinking all connected with real-world activities that encouraged STEM, 21st Century Skills, ICT learning, and career awareness. Working with a mentor, 282 teams of students made their way through the missions, creating deliverables for each milestone to exhibit their understanding of content, concepts, and skills. The challenge culminated in each team creating and submitting a set of Final Deliverables—an Inspiration Board and Project Pitch—that were judged by experts in sports research, parkour, and education. The top five design teams received a prize from Nike.

The SportsLab online platform, developed with a National Science Foundation award (DRL-1311901) and a partnership with the Nike Sport Research Lab (NSRL), is configurable through an easily customizable, Unity-based backend to support the creation and hosting of such competitions, offering both online and real-world learning experiences. Ultimately, we hope to extend the use of the platform through industry and educational partnerships, hosting design challenges grounded in other sport products and relevant themes, like sustainability, that are open to learners in both formal and informal learning spaces. By leveraging students’ real-world interests, SportsLab competitions can foster abilities, interest, and engagement.

What Is a STEAM + Design Thinking Activity? Designing Wearable Technology Accessories
Rie Kijima, Kathy Sun


Are you interested in increasing girls’ interest in STEAM? Come see how design thinking can be used as a tool to inspire girls towards STEAM fields. In this session participants will engage in an immersive design thinking experience that we facilitated with three cohorts of middle school girls. We will actively engage in the various stages of design thinking (e.g., empathize, define, ideate, prototype, and test) to design a specific product for a particular user. Through engagement in and reflection on this activity, participants will gain understanding for why design thinking activities have the potential to increase girls’ interests in STEAM.

Designing Tools and Social Practices to Engage Families in a Learning Ecology to Increase STEM Participation Among Middle School Girls
Evelyn Flores, Nichole Pinkard, Denise C Nacu, Sheena Erete, Bo Ju


As part of a larger effort to broaden participation of underrepresented middle-school aged youth in computing in one mid-sized city, we have been engaged in building a community of parents and caring adults in support of girls’ participation in STEM. This work is centered on Digital Youth Divas (DYD), an out-of-school program that engages middle school girls in design-based engineering and computer science activities driven by a narrative story. In this presentation, we will highlight the design and rationale for tools and social practices intended to involve parents in the STEM learning experiences of their youth. Specifically, we’ll share details about the EL3 Parent Dashboard, and strategies we have used to encourage parents to learn about and reflect on their daughter’s interests, skills, and activities. We will share insights that have driven our design decisions and present ideas and considerations for others who are engaged in community-based work to involve parents and families.

Speakers
KS

Kathy Sun

Assistant Professor, Santa Clara University
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Evelyn Flores

Northwestern University
avatar for James L Larsen

James L Larsen

EdGE at TERC
I'm interested in leveraging games and play to get people outside or to better connect people to real world experiences. My projects include STEMlandia XR, SportsLab, and Mission to Europa (a VR mystery).
avatar for Denise C Nacu

Denise C Nacu

Assistant Professor, DePaul University
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Rie Kijima

Stanford Graduate School of Education
avatar for Rosanna Lopez

Rosanna Lopez

Founder & President, SparkleLAB Design & Innovation Hub
Makerspaces for kids and teensCritical making, youth developmentSchool of the futureReimagining learning in the global south


Thursday October 3, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Doheny Beach A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

Struggle, Frustration, and Equity in Making & Connected Learning: Key Perspectives and Strategies
Have you ever wondered how to reframe failure into productive struggle in creative learning contexts? Wondering about how making activities can support positive connected learning experiences in ways that youth can both participate in and value? In this symposia, presenters will, first, highlight research and key strategies for supporting productive struggle in making-oriented education (10 minutes). Next, participants will engage in a short hands-on, challenge-based activity taking on role of either learner or observer (20 minutes). The last portion of the symposia (30 minutes) includes a facilitated conversation in which small groups will share out observations and reflections, refine and build on the research-based key strategies and structures, and discuss the role of struggle and frustration in Connected Learning. This symposia provides an opportunity for attendees to connect the latest research to practice, explore a making activity that they can bring to their own learning contexts, face challenges in creative processes while reflecting on the metacognitive and emotional experiences youth undergo, and consider new ways to support learners through challenging moments.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Chang

Stephanie Chang

Director of Impact, Maker Ed
Stephanie Chang is the Director of Impact at Maker Ed, having spent 5 years previously leading and designing Maker Ed’s program and project offerings for educators and institutions around the country. Her current work focuses on evaluating the impact and value of programmatic efforts... Read More →
CG

Colin G Dixon

Concord Consortium
avatar for Jessica Parker

Jessica Parker

Director of Teaching and Learning, Exploratorium
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Jean Ryoo

Director of Research, CS Equity Project, UCLA Center X


Thursday October 3, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Doheny Beach C/D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

Adapting Measures of Connected Learning for Formative Evaluation
In this workshop, participants will adapt tools for evaluating connected learning in library spaces, community programs, and schools for purposes of formative program evaluation. Formative evaluation focuses on gathering data for reflection and improvement, and it can help programs become more responsive to the goals and concerns of participants. As part of the workshop, participants will be introduced to the suite of tools developed as part of the Longitudinal Study of Connected Learning of the CLRN, and we will show how these have been adapted for use in library settings. These include tools for identifying youths’ interest-related pursuits across settings, characterizing the degree to which learning environments support the principles of connected learning, and proximal outcomes of connected learning such as civic engagement. In the concluding part of the workshop, we will share strategies for making use of data related to youth interest and experience in informal (library) settings.

Speakers
VM

Vera Michalchik

Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
avatar for Bill Penuel

Bill Penuel

Professor, University of Colorado Boulder
National Center for Research in Policy and Practice, which is focused on how school and district leaders use research. He is one of the developers of an approach to improvement research called Design-Based Implementation Research. He is a member-elect of the National Academy of Education and a Fellow of the International Society of the Learning Sciences.">William R. Penuel is a professor of learning sciences and human development in the Institute of Cognitive Science in the School of Education at the University... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Wortman

Amanda Wortman

Research Manager, University of California, Irvine
avatar for Sari Widman

Sari Widman

Graduate Research Assistant, University of Colorado Boulder


Thursday October 3, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay C 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

Designing for a Global Community of Learners
On the Scratch Team we design for a global learning community that come from different cultures and backgrounds, speak different languages, and have widely varying interests. In this workshop we will share our experiences designing for a global community as well as many of the challenges we face. Participants will engage in small groups to share their own experiences and brainstorm ways to address the various challenges that face these global communities. We will conclude by sharing the designs and ideas from each group and inviting participants to continue the dialogue with us after the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Garrity

Chris Garrity

Developer and Translation Manager, Scratch/MIT Media Lab
As a developer on the Scratch Team I work on all aspects of localization and translation. I'm also involved with running Scratch workshops with young people to try out new features, extensions and content. I want young people from all backgrounds, and all around the world, to have... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

Living and Learning in the Wild: What We Learned Exploring Artificial Intelligence, Ethics, and Education
The future of AI innovations has societal and ethical impacts. Bringing a variety of perspectives and voices into dialogue now will help us in responding not only to our present moment but also in shaping our collective futures. The relationship between technology innovation and education is often one of creator/subject, with teachers and students used by developers to gather “feedback”. We believe that students and teachers have the right to join the ethical debates raised around artificial intelligence and humanity, that the technology community has a responsibility to hear their voices, and that only through mutual examination of these big questions will we be able to shape a future that prioritizes technology in service of humanity. This presentation brings together members of the learning ecosystem in Pittsburgh, a hub for techno-social experimentation around the dissemination of artificial intelligence in community settings, to discuss a recent series of public forums. These community discussions have served to center questions on the intersection of artificial intelligence, ethics, and the education landscape. Our presentation will bring a sampling of activities, thought experiments, and deep inquiry experience from these community forums as a means of expanding the conversation and broadening our collective understanding of these critical issues.


You can view our slides here.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle King

Michelle King

Learning Instigator, Love Activist, & Transformer, Western Pennsylvania Writing Project
Michelle King is a learner first and foremost and as well as an instigator of learning. Professionally, she is a middle school teacher and has taught over 22 years in public schools in Southwestern Pennsylvania. She learned and honed her craft in Mt. Lebanon with a fantastic crew... Read More →
avatar for Ani Martinez

Ani Martinez

Field Director, Remake Learning
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Jessica Kaminsky

Team Lead, CREATE Lab - Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Jordan Mroziak

Jordan Mroziak

Community Outreach Coordinator, Carnegie Mellon University
Jordan Mroziak is Community Outreach Coordinator at CMU's CREATE Lab and an Adjunct Professor of Music at Duquesne University. He recently earned his doctorate in Instructional Technology with an emphasis on creative educational technologies, aesthetic education, and critical & informal... Read More →
avatar for Bea Dias

Bea Dias

Outreach Director, CREATE Lab - Carnegie Mellon University
M. Beatrice Dias (Bea) was born and raised in Sri Lanka and went on to earn her undergraduate degree from Hamilton College in Clinton New York. Following college, she worked in the private sector for two years before moving to Pittsburgh to complete her Ph.D. in Engineering and P... Read More →



Thursday October 3, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:00pm

PM Coffee and Tea
Thursday October 3, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Pacific Ballroom Foyer 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Investigating Learning through Making
(Re)making Whiteness: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Equity-Based Maker Literature
Peter J. Woods
Recently, critical scholars have challenged the white, masculine foundations of the maker movement. That challenge has inspired others to create avenues for marginalized individuals to join these spaces. However, immediately jumping from critique to action often produces unintended consequences (Yancy, 2016). With this in mind, I pose the following research questions: how does diversity and equity-focused maker education literature position marginalized students in relation to making and makerspaces? And how does this positioning challenge or reinscribe whiteness? To approach these questions, I conducted a critical discourse analysis on fourteen different articles about equity in making. Findings show that these studies position marginalized subjects outside of the boundaries formed by maker culture and then invite subjects to either join in or redefine the boundaries of making. While beneficial, this process enacts what Ladson-Billings (2017) defines as the social funding of race and, in part, reinscribes whiteness within making culture.

Fostering Information Literacy Through Autonomy and Guidance in the Inquiry and Maker Learning Environments    
Lo Lee
The study investigates high school students’ information practices and educators’ guidance during inquiry and maker learning. Self-Determination Theory and Imposed Query offer theoretical lenses in exploring students’ information practices in the learning environments that support learners’ choices and interests within the standards-based curriculums. Students engaged in a variety of information behaviors, such as information seeking, use, evaluating, creating, and sharing. Information searching and credibility judgment were some of the most challenging but helpful activities for students to complete their projects. Students enjoyed production-centered activities. When given a wide range of options for information creation in the maker unit, students seemed to be both excited and overwhelmed. Educators offered different strategies to scaffold students’ information practices and learning, striving to achieve a balance between providing guidance and allowing student autonomy and choice. Overall, students were appreciative and found the guidance beneficial; yet, they felt some guidelines were restrictive. The study suggests educators be intentional in providing guidance that is flexible and not too restricted or controlled. The ongoing research investigates the optimal environments for learners to exercise autonomy over their information practices and learning while feeling supported and guided.

Holding Values in Tension in a Technology Enhanced After School Club                                           
Robbin Riedy
In this paper we reflect on our experiences designing for and supporting learning around technology enhanced making in an play based after school club (STAR). We examine various tensions related to the values we wanted to support in this making space and we draw on critical approaches to care to understand our design and facilitation decisions as we grappled with these tensions.


Speakers
avatar for Peter Woods

Peter Woods

Doctoral Candidate, UW-Madison
RR

Robbin Riedy

University of Colorado Boulder
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Lo Lee

PhD Student, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Thursday October 3, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Doheny Beach B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Connected Learning in Early Childhood
Families@Play: Supporting Young Children’s Understanding of Computational Thinking Through Unplugged Family Activities
Sinem Siyahhan, Bekir Mugayitoglu


Throughout the last decade, computational thinking (CT) has emerged as a set of concepts, practices, and perspectives (Brennan & Resnick, 2012) that everyone (not just computer scientists) needs to develop to participate in the 21st century successfully. While a significant amount of effort has been put into integrating CT across the preK-12 curriculum, an area that still needs further investigation is how we can support young children’s understanding of CT in the context of the home. This workshop aims to address this gap by (a) inviting participants to learn about the unplugged CT family activities developed and tested by the researchers, and (b) engaging them in a design thinking process where they create their own unplugged CT activities for families with young children (ages 4 to 7). The workshop will conclude with a reflection on participants’ experiences and a group discussion on the challenges of and opportunities for this area of research and development.

Conversational Agents as Educational Video Co-Viewers for Young Children
Ying Xu, Mark Warschauer


Science television shows are an important source of informal education and enrichment for preschool-aged children in the United States, who spend an average of two hours daily on screen media at home or in other non-school settings. However, the educational benefits of television face an important limitation: the medium does not allow children to interact with the content in any true sense. This limitation can be overcome by family members coviewing shows with children and providing conversational scaffolding, but research suggests that this practice is not common, especially for children in lower-socioeconomic households.

To maximize the benefits of time spent on screen media, this project leverages an intelligent conversational agent (CA) —an on-screen character capable of processing and responding to spoken language—to add social contingency into children’s experience watching science videos. Specifically, the interactive character intermittently pauses the video and asks children questions, and offers contingent feedback that varies based on children’s responses. A field test showed that children enjoyed the interactive viewing experience and actively engaged in scientific inquiry with the CA. This finding suggests that co-viewing with a CA may enhance children’s engagement, and can potentially benefit their science learning and oral language development. Implications and future directions are discussed.

Thinking Sideways: Computational Thinking and Early Literacy in the Public Library
Claudia Haines, Paula Langsam


We need diverse and divergent ideas to solve big problems. How do we prepare young children to be able to communicate and express themselves in a connected world? What are the key critical thinking skills that young children (ages 3-8), and their families, need in order to understand, navigate, and create in all media formats? We use playful, child-led activities to explore the relationship between early literacy and computational thinking skills. Creating low-stress, informal learning experiences supports young children as they become successful problem-solvers, creative thinkers, and lifelong learners in informal education spaces.

Yes, They Can Make That: A Study of Young Learners in the World's First Early Childhood Fab Lab
 Elisabeth Sylvan


The Center for Childhood Creativity (CCC), the Bay Area Discovery Museum’s (BADM) research and advisory division, is investigating how young children’s experiences in a Fab Lab impact their understanding of and interest in digital fabrication and how to best design makerspace experiences for ages 4 to 10. This research focused on providing children experience with a 3D printer, laser cutter, and vinyl cutter. Nine 7-to 10-year-olds and twelve 4- to 5-year-olds engaged in two respective age-appropriate Fab Lab programs. All participants are completing a series of pre- and post-assessments that investigate developmental differences in and effects of their Fab Lab experience on: (1) understanding of the three digital fabrication tools; (2) ideas about engineering design processes; (3) self-efficacy with regard to digital fabrication; and (4) general impressions of their Fab Lab experience. Observational data is being collected including photographs of children’s projects and journals (notebooks for planning and reflection). Additionally, educators and parents are being asked to complete a survey and/or interview on their views and experiences with early childhood maker spaces. Due to the novelty of digital fabrication activities for children, this work will beneficially provide unique insight into young individuals’ experiences in the world’s first early childhood Fab Lab.

Speakers
avatar for Elisabeth Sylvan

Elisabeth Sylvan

Managing Director, Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard
.
SS

Sinem Siyahhan

Associate Professor, Cal State San Marcos
Sinem Siyahhan is Associate Director of the CSUSM Center for Research and Engagement in STEM Education. She is an Associate Professor of Educational Technology and Learning Sciences, and a core faculty member in the Educational Leadership Joint Doctoral Program at California State... Read More →
MW

Mark Warschauer

Professor, UC Irvine
avatar for Bekir Mugayitoglu

Bekir Mugayitoglu

Computer Science Educator, STEM Family
Bekir Mugayitoglu received his doctorate in Instructional Technology and Leadership from Duquesne University’s School of Education in 2016. While completing the program, he worked for Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Academy as a content developer of games that immersed students... Read More →
avatar for Claudia Haines

Claudia Haines

Youth Services Librarian, Homer Public Library
I am a youth services librarian, consultant and author. I support the diverse literacy and learning needs of kids, teens and families with dynamic programs, access to great media of all kinds and community collaborations. I advise and train other librarians on media mentorship and... Read More →
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Paula Langsam

Librarian, DC Public Library
YX

Ying Xu

University of California, Irvine


Thursday October 3, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Doheny Beach A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Exploring Identity Construction in Virtual Reality Systems
Research has shown that learners’ real-world identities and virtual identities have a significant impact on educational outcomes. The process of establishing a virtual identity can not only reveal aspects of a learner’s real-world identity, it can also influence the way they interact with a piece of educational technology. In this workshop, we will ground a discussion of virtual identity in three immersive, educational artifacts: Cellverse (Thompson, Wang, Roy & Klopfer, 2019), Passage Home VR (Olson, 2019), and AIRvatar (Harrell and Lim, 2017). Cellverse is a cross-platform, collaborative game where pairs of students diagnose and treat a diseased cell. With respect to identity, the aims of the work are to support learners’ self-image as scientific thinkers, to support the development of a professional identity, and to support the legitimate peripheral participation in a community of practice. Passage Home VR is an interactive narrative VR game that operationalizes a novel computational model of racial and ethnic socialization (RES) (Hughes et al., 2006) as a step toward improving approaches to virtual race and ethnicity representation in video games. AIRvatar is a tool for monitoring, collecting, and storing telemetry data developed to study real-world and virtual identity phenomena. As part of the NSF-backed “Computing for Advanced Identity Representation” project, AIRvatar was used to study the impact of virtual identities on educational outcomes. Workshop attendees will participate in discussion-based activities and engage with several interactive system demos. Participants are strongly encouraged to bring laptops to the session.

Speakers
avatar for Dan Roy

Dan Roy

Research Scientist, MIT
Dan Roy is a research scientist at the Education Arcade and the Playful Journey Lab. He is the lead game designer on the CLEVR project, inviting high school biology students to explore a cell in VR and collaboratively diagnose and treat a genetic disorder. Dan is also the founder... Read More →
avatar for Meredith Thompson

Meredith Thompson

Research Scientist and Lecturer, MIT
DO

Danielle Olson

Doctoral Student, MIT


Thursday October 3, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay D/E 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Notes as Nodes in Connected Learning
Web annotation draws upon centuries-old practices of adding marginalia, information, and commentary to books and other print manuscripts, and extends this layer as an interactive feature of the web turning digital texts into discursive contexts. Despite growth in the use of web annotation among diverse learning and professional contexts, a need persists to describe and document how web annotation mediates collaboration, learning, and knowledge production. This symposium proposes a moderated conversation about web annotation and connected learning. A panel comprised of six educators and researchers working in K12, higher education, and open learning contexts will be asked about design principles, collaboration patterns, and learning practices associated with their use of web annotation across multiple projects and learning environments. Featured projects - including the Marginal Syllabus, Networked Narratives, and Augmenting Intellect - have all used the free, open-source web annotation tool Hypothesis to mediate collaboration and learning among students, educators, and professionals. Featured panelists [blinded for review] will respond to questions about: a) the design practices that meaningfully support and sustain collaborative annotation for connected learning; b) the various forms of collaboration, including discipline-specific and civic, afforded by web annotation; and c) the learning practices and outcomes engendered by open and collaborative web annotation. The conversation will be moderated by [blinded]. Following introductions and the initial series of questions, at least 20 minutes of the symposium will be dedicated to audience engagement via question-and-answer. A blog post featuring linked resources and research will complement the conversation.

Speakers
avatar for Mia Zamora

Mia Zamora

Associate Professor of English, Kean University
Writer. Educator. Connector. Maker.Associate Professor of English, Director of MA in Writing Studies & Kean University Writing Project; DML blogger.
avatar for Christina Cantrill

Christina Cantrill

National Programs, National Writing Project
avatar for Kira J Baker-Doyle

Kira J Baker-Doyle

Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago
AG

Antero Garcia

Stanford University
RK

Remi Kalir

Assistant Professor, CU Denver


Thursday October 3, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Doheny Beach C/D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Reclaiming Digital Futures - Integrating Digital Media in Informal Youth Development Programs
In this session, leaders of out-of-school programs across the country will describe best practices and ways to deeply integrate digital media and learning in community-based learning experiences. The organizations in this session were funded by the Susan Crown Exchange, Digital Learning Challenge, and collaborated to develop a field-facing resource https://digitallearningpractices.org/. Educators and leaders from The Knowledge House, West Michigan Center for Arts & Technology, YOUMedia at Chicago Public Libraries, Free Spirit Media, and the Beam Center will share some of the ways that digital media based learning is deeply embedded in programs that engage youth in computer science, media arts, media production and journalism, making, and engineering. 

Speakers
avatar for Haviland Rummel

Haviland Rummel

Executive Director, Susan Crown Exchange (SCE)
Haviland Rummel is the Program Director at SCE, where she leads the organization’s strategy and grantmaking. She has worked with a variety of nonprofits across sectors including cultural institutions, human service agencies, educational institutions, and healthcare organizations... Read More →
JF

Joselina Fay

Associate Director, Art Center Programs, DreamYard Project
avatar for Rafi Santo

Rafi Santo

CSforALL, Telos Learning
JR

Jerelyn Rodriguez

Cofounder and CEO, The Knowledge House
avatar for Jeff McCarter

Jeff McCarter

Founder & Executive Director, Free Spirit Media
DT

Daniel Thorson

YOUmedia Assistant Manager, Chicago Public Library
JA

June Anh

University of California, Irvine
CS

Calvin Stalvig

Beam Center
AN

Anjel Newman

AS220 Youth
MR

Mary Reisenwitz

Special Projects Manager, Digital Harbor Foundation


Thursday October 3, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Pacific Ballroom A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Learn to Build Robust, Low-Cost, Solar Powered Digital Libraries for Deployment at Under-Resourced Schools in Rural Zimbabwe
The importance of education is well known; across sub-Saharan Africa the picture remains shockingly bleak. This workshop focuses on real-world solutions. We will create portable, robust digital libraries for schools and communities in locations without internet and/or electricity. Based on a Raspberry Pi computer and using other low cost, simple off-the-shelf parts we will make Learning Centers using a “Bridge Pi” device that provides local access to freely available curated content via a wifi hotspot that can serve dozens of people simultaneously. Participants will learn first-hand how to build this surprisingly easy, accessible, and low cost answer. Teams will build from two alternative designs to highlight the iterative design process. Devices made during this session will subsequently be brought to Zimbabwe reaching hundreds of students and teachers.

Speakers
MS

Manning Sutton

Apprendre Sans Frontières
avatar for Bob Rollins

Bob Rollins

Bridge Project Director, US-Africa Children's Fellowship
Check out the online prototype of the (all open source) Bridge Project Digital Library http://bit.ly/BridgeProject



Thursday October 3, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Making Observations: Identifying Values of Learning to Support Evaluation
Spaces where youth and teens have opportunities to make and learn on their own time connected to what they care about have proliferated in formal and informal spaces. Young people are doing amazing things in these spaces but there are also concerns about who is learning and being supported and potential inequities related to gender and marginalized youth. It is difficult to measure and assess learning through making, and what “success” looks like may look different for different environments. In this session, educators and researchers from YOUmedia in Chicago and the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh will facilitate activities for participants to learn more about measurement through observation, remixing and adapting different existing observation tools and resources, and reflect on potential purposes of measurement and observation in unique settings, especially in ways that inform decision-making at individual, collective, and organizational levels.

Speakers
avatar for Ephran Ramirez

Ephran Ramirez

Lead STEM Mentor - YOUmedia, Chicago Public Library
I'm interested in the intersections of science education and social justice.Science should be made accessible to all youth, regardless of race, class, gender, orientation, etc. Finding ways to eliminate the barriers in science education is crucial to our success as a whole and to... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Brahms

Lisa Brahms

Director of Learning & Research, Children's Museum of Pittsburgh
Lisa Brahms, Ph.D. is Director of Learning and Research at Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, as well as a visiting researcher with the University of Pittsburgh Center for Learning in Out of School Environments (UPCLOSE).  Lisa earned her PhD in Learning Sciences and Policy at the... Read More →
avatar for Eric Reyes

Eric Reyes

Digital Media Coordinator, Chicago Public Library
Eric Reyes works in the Teen Services/YOUmedia Department of the Chicago Public Library. Prior to joining CPL, Eric worked in education with formerly incarcerated adults, as a recording instructor, and as a facilitator/engineer at StoryCorps Chicago. Eric has a MA in Sociology and... Read More →
avatar for Peter Wardrip

Peter Wardrip

Assistant Professor of STEAM Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Peter Wardrip is an Assistant Professor of STEAM Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research focuses on informal/formal learning collaborations, professional learning for educators, formative assessment and making as a learning process. Peter earned his PhD in Learning... Read More →
avatar for Caitlin Martin

Caitlin Martin

Design and Research, CKMartin Consulting
DT

Daniel Thorson

YOUmedia Assistant Manager, Chicago Public Library


Thursday October 3, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay C 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Using Transformational Game Design to Amplify Youth’s Voice and Support Their Social and Emotional Skills
Using activities and projects conducted during two week-long high school summer programs about transformational game design and social and emotional learning, this workshop will provide hands-on opportunities for participants to learn projects and strategies they can use with youth to support their learning about game development while enhancing their social and emotional skills. Participants will engage in key activities that were effective during the high school program and learn some of the presenters’ takeaways from conducting the summer programs. The series of activities conducted during the workshop will result in participants making a game pitch to the presenters and other participants. From this workshop, participants will leave with ideas they can use for developing youth’s knowledge and understanding of game design and social and emotional skills as well as approaches they can implement when working on game development teams.

Speakers
AL

Amanda L Armstrong

Games Lab Coordinator, New Mexico State University


Thursday October 3, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

PM Break
Thursday October 3, 2019 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Pacific Ballroom Foyer 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

5:00pm

Ignite Talks
Ignite talks are radically different from traditional conference talks. You will be dazzled by humor, wit, energy and inspiration packed into one powerful five-minute talk.

Ignite Talks will be hosted by Sam Dyson.

Presentations:
The Magic Ingredient: Using Pop Culture Effectively
Janae Phillips

Design Charrettes: Serving the Community That Served You
Wendy Roldan

Queering Up Game Development Spaces Through Discord Servers
Jeremy Dietmeier

On Being Late to the Game
Corey Sparks

The Crisis of Democracy, the Problem With Algorithms, the Lack of Discord, the Truth About Reality and Fantasy and the Most Important Thing About Humans in 5 Minutes or Less
Nikolaus Koenig

Towards a Powerful Role for Public Libraries in the CL Ecosystem
Kelly Wortham

More Than Just a Bunch of Parts: Expanding the Learning Ecosystem Analogy Using Insights From Biological Systems
Marijke Hecht

Preparing K-5 Teachers to Integrate the Computer Science Standards of Learning in Inclusive Classrooms to Support Students With High Incidence Disabilities
Amy Hutchison



Speakers
avatar for Amy Hutchison

Amy Hutchison

Associate Professor, George Mason University
digital literacy, computer science for students with disabilitiesDr. Hutchison is an associate professor and the Director of the Division of Elementary, Literacy, and Secondary Education at George Mason University. Currently, she is the Primiary Investigator or Co-Primary Investigator... Read More →
avatar for Janae Phillips

Janae Phillips

Director of Leadership and Education, Harry Potter Alliance
Janae Phillips is a multimedia storyteller focused on finding the through lines that connect us all. In a decade of work as a trainer and organizer, including five years as the Director of Leadership and Education at the Harry Potter Alliance, she has worked with thousands of the... Read More →
KW

Kelly Wortham

Librarian, Santa Monica Public Library
avatar for Corey Sparks

Corey Sparks

Assistant Professor, California State University, Chico
JD

Jeremy Dietmeier

University of Iowa
avatar for Marijke Hecht

Marijke Hecht

Graduate Student Researcher, University of Pittsburgh School of Education
perpetually curious learning ecologist & urban nature geek
avatar for Wendy Roldan

Wendy Roldan

PhD Student, University of Washington
Family learning, equity in HCI and engineering education
NK

Nikolaus Koenig

Researcher, Danube-University


Thursday October 3, 2019 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

2019 Tech Demos + Opening Reception
Welcome to the 2018 Tech Showcase and Opening Reception. The Tech showcase is festive science fair like event that takes place during our opening reception. We have a terrific line-up of demos, make sure to check them out!

Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

3D Models and Interactivity: Going Beyond Text-Based Game Learning
Abstract
Educational use of new technologies can transform online learning through the inclusion of interactive learning-environments. In Agriculture at Iowa State University, we apply game-based learning to introduce undergraduate learners to the microbiology world. This 15-minute showcase presentation will demonstrate two types of game-based learning modules: text-based game learning module before re-design, and more interactive game design module with the help of Storyline and embedded 3D models. Participants will have opportunity to explore both modules, followed by a short discussion on how games can enhance teaching and learning effectiveness.

Speakers
avatar for Chuanli (Lily) Zhou

Chuanli (Lily) Zhou

Instructional Development Coordinator, Iowa State University


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Brianna's World: Game-Based Skill Training for the Human Service Workforce
Brianna’s World is an interactive game designed to facilitate competency development among persons whose profession demands working with disruptive family situations. The player selects an avatar and is immersed in a work situation where they are asked to respond to a referral from a local school for a family home visit. Competency development includes engagement with a diverse set of characters, cultural competence, interviewing, and strength-based assessment. The game also rewards player demonstrations of empathy, respect, and authenticity in their interactions. During the Showcase, the designers will display visuals of the game and provide an overview of the collaborative scenario development process. Specifically highlighted is how the game was designed to dynamically and interactively appraise the player responses to characters and situations and receive feedback. Perspectives on Brianna World game play will be shared, including those of graduate students and instructors. The Showcase will also present the design of the post-game experience, called Thrive Cast, that offers access to an on-going collaborative learning community dealing with competency development and strength-based assessments.

Speakers
avatar for Walter LaMendola

Walter LaMendola

Professor Emeritus, University of Denver


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Building on Youth Interests Through Coding: New Resources in Scratch 3.0
In this poster, we’ll highlight strategies for supporting creative learning and computational thinking across interest areas. With the launch of the new version of Scratch there are a variety of free learning resources available to support youth in exploring their passions through creative coding. We’ll share the new library of Scratch Tutorials that show how to create a wide range of projects, from making animations that talk aloud to creating interactive motion games using video sensing. Come to talk over what's available with Scratch Team members, provide feedback, and learn how to use these new resources to support playful experimentation and individualized learning.

Speakers
avatar for Kristin Osiecki

Kristin Osiecki

Learning Designer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab
Learning Designer on the Scratch team in the MIT Media Lab's Lifelong Kindergarten Group. Currently creating educational experiences which engage learners in creative programming activities with Scratch.


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Constructing Haenyeo: Defamiliarzation and Sensemaking in the Serious Game Design Process
Sensemaking occurs at both fronts of visual cognition— creation and interpretation. We explore the first front of visual culture cognition, the work of designers and artists, by developing the game Mermaids of Ieodo, which represents in an analog card game the traditional cultural practices of the Korean Haenyeo, diving women of Jeju Island. Game elements intend to capture themes in Haenyeo practices, including meditative engagement with nature, cross-generational interaction, historical influences on the community, ecological preservation practices, and ethical attitudes towards technology. Through the process of defamiliarization (Bell, Blythe, & Sengers, 2005) and making strange the process of creating a visual cultural artifact, we aim to break down the first front of how visual culture is read. By participating in the process of creating a visual culture artifact and cataloging our design choices, we are able to interrogate the construction of an East Asian cultural experience. Situating this traditional practice in an analog card game allows the game to engage with the both the technological and traditional imaginaries that Korean culture operate in.

Speakers
MW

Minerva Wu

Doctoral Student, University of California, Irvine
WD

William Dunkel

PhD Student, UCI


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Design Tools for Engagement
At Participate’s Tech Demo station, we invite you to dive into our Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) Design Clinic. Supported by an online community of practice, educators design learning experiences for their students that integrate academic skills, global competencies, civic action, and innovative problem-solving.

Play with our SDG Design Card Decks to develop ideas for service learning projects. Get inspired by stories of young people working to solve some of the most pressing challenges of our time. Join virtual discussions with educators all over the world who are building their practice by exchanging ideas, stories, resources, and feedback. Explore the future of networked professional development.

Speakers
LR

Liz Radzicki

Education Strategist, Participate, Inc.


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Election Lab: Where STEM Meets Civics
Election Lab combines math and civics in a game-based learning platform for middle- and high-school students. It opens the eyes of learners to the hidden but strategic role of STEM professionals in increasingly data-driven presidential campaigns. The games present learners with one of several actual election scenarios from recent history--from landslides to very tight races. The game design is a hybrid of a board game and computer, leveraging advantages of both formats. The physical board game:
(1) uses large, high-resolution electoral maps and manipulatives;
(2) provides a hands-on experience;
(3) uses an intuitive and accessible format for planning and executing campaigns;
(4) increases accessibility for English language learners and others who may not benefit from traditional presentations of math concepts.
The accompanying computer:
(1) speeds up play with an interactive display that updates after each state battle;
(2) automatically calculates the Electoral Vote totals for each candidate;
(3) and most importantly, captures gameplay data for later statistical analysis and discussion.
The result is a novel informal learning program that uses math to understand strategies used in elections, and uses data generated from gameplay to allow learners to think like statisticians. Elections come alive when they are played, driving history learning. Finally, the experiencing an election from the point of view of a campaign strategist, and understanding the convoluted mechanics of the Electoral College first-hand, will engage future voters, especially for populations that have historically low voter participation.

Speakers
avatar for Jasminka Criley, MD

Jasminka Criley, MD

CEO, Indelible Learning, Inc.
Health, Science, K-60 Education, Career-Education, Hands-on learning, PBL, GBL, 21st century learning, Medicine, Medical Pathways, Mentoring
avatar for Stuart Criley

Stuart Criley

Chief Operating Officer, Indelible Learning, Inc.
We place learners in the shoes of professionals, with real-world scenarios, using actual historical data, and consequential decisions to make. Election Lab is a chance to play campaign strategist: with only weeks left in the presidential campaign, in which swing states should you... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Equitable Design Pathways: Building an Opportunities Portal on DiscoverDesign.org - How an Online Portal Seeks to Bridge the Equity Gaps in Architecture, Construction, Engineering, and Design Spaces in the K-12 Connected Learning Context
Architecture, Construction, Engineering, and Design (ACED) fields are in the midst of an equity epidemic. According to the National Council of Architectural Registration Board (NCARB) only 1 in 5 architects identify as ethnic minorities while just 1 in 3 architects are women. To address this equity, in July of 2018 the Chicago Architecture Center (CAC) and the American Institute of Architects Chicago (AIA Chicago) partnered to convene, document, and describe the K-12 architecture and design education opportunity landscape in Chicago for in-school and out-of-school contexts. The project, which has culminated into a landscape report, sought to answer basic questions about access to architecture education available to Chicago youth. Findings in the report aim to better understand the pathways available within the architecture and design education ecosystem. Issues addressed lend insight into how connected learning practitioners are working to enable connections across professional, informal, and academic settings. The 2019 Connected Learning Summit will be the first opportunity for CAC to share the findings of this report with a key community of practice. In addition to the report, CAC will be showcasing a pre-release version of the online opportunities portal built as a result of the data collected in the initial report. CAC will share initial wireframes, user-experience mockups, and a working prototype of the DiscoverDesign.org Opportunities Portal with the CLS community. The objective of sharing this work-in-progress is to share insights learned and gather feedback for continued development.

Speakers
avatar for Edgar ‘Edge’ Quintanilla

Edgar ‘Edge’ Quintanilla

Digital Manager - DiscoverDesign.org, Chicago Architecture Center


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Global Game Jam NEXT: A Curriculum for STEAM Learning
Global Game Jam is the world’s largest game jam and until recently, targeted adults. Considering the potentially significant role of games and game development as educational platforms, in 2018 Global Game Jam launched GGJ NEXT, for youth age 12-17. Now, GGJ NEXT has been iterated for year 2, held in July 2019. This report discusses the background, curriculum development, event organization, and lessons learnt from the inaugural GGJ NEXT, and its second year in 2019. This report describes the ideas, process, curriculum, and some results of the inaugural GGJ NEXT event. As the first Global Game Jam for youth, GGJ NEXT aimed at providing an educational framework for youth in the context of making games. The goal was to create not just a global event but a comprehensive framework including a free and flexible curriculum aimed primarily at teachers, and an efficient content generation and distribution system.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Farber

Matthew Farber

Assistant Professor, University of Northern Colorado
Matthew Farber, Ed.D. is an assistant professor of Technology, Innovation, and Pedagogy at the University of Northern Colorado. He has been invited to the White House, to keynote for UNESCO, and he has been interviewed about games and learning by NPR, Fox News Radio, USA Today, and... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Immersive Learning Experience Design (ILXD) Workshop
In this workshop, attendees experience using the Immersive Learning Experience Design (ILXD) design model first-hand by playing the “ILXD Alchemy” board game that was developed to introduce the model in a conference setting and timeframe.

The ILXD model incorporates tools to leverage VR/AI to improve flow and foster empathy, methods to promote sensemaking and constructivism, and analytic processes for measuring learning outcomes.

The ILXD design model can be used immediately by experienced developers to improve learning outcomes in VR/AI, while providing a framework that novice developers can use to inform and structure their research and training to improve their skills and literacy regarding immersive learning.

Workshop attendees receive access to a dedicated VR/AI experience that demonstrates each of the tools and processes in the model. Additionally, attendees also receive access to an online course that provides additional resources, references, and connects developers in a learning community regarding the model.

The Engaged Learning Technologies team at Adtalem has been presenting the ILXD model using the ILXD Alchemy game at conferences and professional development activities since September, 2018.

The workshop is Intended for key stakeholders in designing and developing immersive learning for higher education. Previous experience with VR/AI is not required, but experience in learning design and delivery is strongly recommended.

Speakers
avatar for James Kiggens

James Kiggens

Director, Immersive Learning Experience Team, Adtalem Global Education
As the Director of the Immersive Learning Experience team in the Innovation Center of Excellence at Adtalem Global Education, I lead the game production team that develops and supports immersive game-based learning for Adtalem Global Education institutions. I look forward to hearing... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

LifeStory
LifeStory is a flexible interactive learning game framework that incorporates mobile technology, game technology, learning, ecology, North American Indigenous epistemologies, and science education. Users of LifeStory are encouraged to take on the perspectives of non-human actors in ecosystems as they play through pre-packaged life stories of non-human characters or build their own playable stories. It can be used in concert with outdoor education, Indigenous science, Indigenous knowledge systems, digital storytelling, and mainstream science education initiatives. LifeStory enacts STEAM (STEM plus Art) learning in an interactive user-directed game building environment. It also encourages perspectives of the natural world that are empathetic, engage systems thinking and enact North American Indigenous epistemologies.

Speakers

Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Mobile Responsive Training Packages to Enhance Distance Learning
This Tech Demo will outline how staff at Education Development Center (EDC) are using a simple authoring tool to repackage our live webinar events, conference calls, and email communications into streamlined online training bundles for our audience. These supplemental online training packages have helped support a blended learning approach in our self-paced online trainings which historically have been broken up into disparate pieces.
These user-friendly packages enable our audience to find all the materials for their training in one easy-to-access link. It is all organized and customized for each audience so they can quickly locate the webinar recordings (if they miss a live event), handouts, online toolkits, conference call-in information, videos, podcasts, website references, and more. EDC staff curate the information and materials in each supplemental training package for each distinct audience so they have a more tailored training experience with minimal effort on our part.
It doesn’t cost much; it doesn’t take a lot of time or programming expertise to build; it is mobile responsive; and, we can quickly and easily update the online content in real-time. This session will explain how these packages have helped us deliver our curriculum much more easily and efficiently to our virtual audiences and streamline communication to these audience members. Above all, this approach is a perfect example of how EDC develops innovative delivery mechanisms for capacity building in response to the needs of our audience.

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Baptista

Zoe Baptista

Curriculum/Instructional Design Associate, Education Development Center


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Pairing Active Play with Programming using Unruly Splats
At Unruly Studios, our mission is to change the way that teachers and students think about coding and to bring active STEM play to all types of classrooms. We have developed Splats: super-durable programmable buttons. Splats are programmed to light up, make sounds, and sense when they are stepped on.

With Splats, elementary and middle school students can create their own games using our block coding language, and then play them with classmates! Splats bring movement and collaboration to the classroom and gym - all while introducing fundamental STEM concepts. Splats are being used by students of varying ages and needs in a variety of learning spaces: classrooms, gyms, libraries, innovation labs, makerspaces, and out-of-school contexts.

Stop by the Unruly demo to play some of our favorite games and even try making your own!

Speakers
EW

Emily Wilson

Education Director, Unruly Studios


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Passion to Purpose
Convergence Design Lab’s Passion to Purpose (P2P) is a free open-source and delightful online tool that lets learners flex and grow their civic imagination muscles. Users are guided through a series of fun prompts (eg: What do you geek out about? What do you want to protest?). With the aid of a built in randomizer, they land on an unexpected “How might we question”. Think of it as a brainstorming tool on steroids that helps learners land at the starting gate fully prepared to launch their own inspired project for media action and civic change.

Created and coded by an intergenerational team of educators and creative technologists at Columbia College’s Convergence Design Lab —P2P is built for formal and informal educators who want to spark creative ideas and help learners turn their intrinsic interests into extrinsic actions that can mobilize their peers and communities.

Passion to Purpose is the first game-like module in an integrated suite called the Civic Imagination Toolkit being developed by Convergence Design Lab. Our mission is to help educators cultivate learner agency and civic participation using design thinking and connected learning principles. The Toolkit includes a Facilitator Guide that allows educators to easily adapt the tools for a project-based learning classroom or workshop contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Mindy Faber

Mindy Faber

Director, Convergence Design Lab, Columbia College Chicago
Mindy Faber is the Program Director of Convergence Design Lab, an applied research center and design studio at Columbia College Chicago’s School of Media Arts that partners with organizations to prepare youth to become future-ready, media fluent and active participants in public... Read More →
avatar for Margaret Conway

Margaret Conway

Learning Experience Designer, Convergence Design Lab Columbia College


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Shadowspect: A Creative Geometry Game-Based Assessment
Shadowspect is a geometry-based puzzle game that assesses 3D geometry skills, spatial reasoning, creativity, and persistence using movement and manipulation of 3D shapes. It has been developed as an experimental environment that supports exploration and creativity with assessment principles integrated into the design and development process from the start. Academically, it targets Common Core standards in high school geometry and three-dimensional objects. In addition to the academic standards, the game mechanics are designed to assess persistence, creativity, and spatial reasoning.

Speakers
avatar for Yoon Jeon "YJ" Kim

Yoon Jeon "YJ" Kim

Executive Director, Playful Journey Lab
Dr. YJ Kim is the executive director of the MIT Playful Journey Lab (playful.mit.edu). Her work has centered on the topic of innovative assessment and how technological advancement influences what we are measuring about student learning and how we are measuring it. For more than ten... Read More →
avatar for Louisa Rosenheck

Louisa Rosenheck

Associate Director, MIT Playful Journey Lab
Louisa Rosenheck is the Associate Director and Creative Lead of the MIT Playful Journey Lab. She manages the design, content, and development of educational games and software, and oversees the research on how ed tech can be effectively used in both formal and informal educational... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Social Media TestDrive: Enhancing Social Media Literacy Through Experiential Learning in a Social Media Simulation
Social media literacy is a vital but rarely taught skill set for today’s youth. To address this problem, we have developed an innovative social media literacy education platform called Social Media TestDrive. This tool provides youth with a safe place to learn about and experience social media without the potential negative impacts of being on a real social media site. Social Media TestDrive features a social media simulation that provides a realistic but protected environment for learning. Each educational module offers multiple opportunities for learners to discover key concepts and to practice social media skills and mindful decision-making. Education occurs through demonstrations of prosocial behaviors, guided activities where learners can practice skills, exploration on the social media simulation’s timeline through free-play, and reflection. Topics specific to social media literacy are covered in our educational modules, such as online privacy, self-presentation, and cyberbullying. The main goal of Social Media TestDrive is to enhance core media literacy competencies in middle school youth who are on the brink of engaging in the world of social media. To this end, the program aims to impart skills and self-efficacy for prosocial behaviors on social media platforms, and to develop the ability to critically evaluate social media, including message quality, credibility, and consequences. In this showcase, we will introduce the Social Media TestDrive platform, including how it was developed, its theoretical background, and our main educational approaches.

Speakers
YH

Yoon Hyung Choi

Postdoctoral Research Associate, Cornell University


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Space Explorers: What-if Hypothetical Implementations in Minecraft
The goal of WHIMC is to develop computer simulations that engage, excite, and generate interest in science. WHIMC leverages Minecraft as a learning environment for learners to interactively explore the scientific consequences of alternative versions of Earth via “what if?” questions, such as “What if the earth had no moon?” or “What if the earth were twice its current size?”

Learners using our mods are invited to make observations and propose scientific explanations for what they see as different. Given ongoing discoveries of potentially habitable worlds throughout the Galaxy, such questions have high relevance to public discourse around space exploration, conditions necessary for life, and the long-term future of the human race. Studies in our project are occurring across three informal learning settings: museum exhibits, after school programs, and summer camps.

Speakers
SY

Sherry Yi

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Super Word: Accessible Voice Games for Children with Communication Impairments (CwCI)
Communication disorders are the most common childhood disabilities. At clinics and schools, many children with communication impairments (CwCI) have the support of speech therapists, as well as peer interaction with other children with similar disabilities. However, at home, the only support many children have is their parents and their opportunity for meaningful play is limited. Connected learning acknowledges the complex and interconnected character of the spaces in which children develop communication skills and recognizes the diverse settings in which learning happens. To bridge the disconnection between home and school-clinic, we designed Super Word, a voice game that allows children to participate in vocabulary exercises at home. This quiz game utilizes receptive language elicitation tasks developed from conventional language assessments (e.g., oral definition, synonyms) and novel sound stimuli to engage children in voice-based therapy exercises. Using the Amazon Echo smart home speaker, this game can be enabled in connected settings like school or the therapist’s clinic. In this demo, we will present the initial design of the game prototype and discuss the evaluation plan to examine differences in the game performance between typically developing children and CwCI. By creating a product that supports learning across time and location, we aim to better serve children, parents, and therapists and promote long-term therapy success.

Speakers
YD

Yao Du

PhD Candidate, University of California, Irvine


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

6:00pm

Voices Heard and Unheard: Practicing Equity in Managing Whole Class Discussions
When directing a class discussion, teachers must consider many factors: Who speaks? For how long? And what type of questions are they asked? In this tech demo, participants will experience a simulation called Managing Whole Class Discussions designed to give teachers the opportunity to manage a whole class discussion. We will then reflect and discuss in-simulation actions using the EQUIP tool (Reinholz and Shah, 2018), an analytic framework for “quantifying” equity in a class discussion to promote teacher reflection. Participants will also look at data visualizations of simulated data to give feedback for future design iterations.

Speakers
avatar for Meredith Thompson

Meredith Thompson

Research Scientist and Lecturer, MIT


Thursday October 3, 2019 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Pacific Ballroom C / Pacific Ballroom Patio 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697
 
Friday, October 4
 

8:00am

AM Coffee and Pastries
Friday October 4, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am
Pacific D Ballroom Patio

8:00am

Working Room
Need a space to work? You can come in to answer email or make a phone call. Please note that this is a group working space.

Friday October 4, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
Pacific Ballroom B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

8:00am

Luggage hold
Chill out in peace and quiet! No talking, meeting groups, or phone calls in this room please.

Luggage will also be stored in this space. Check-in desk will be located outside the room.



Friday October 4, 2019 8:00am - 5:30pm
Crescent B 311 W Peltason Dr, Irvine, CA 92697

8:00am

Quiet Room
Chill out in peace and quiet! No talking, meeting groups, or phone calls in this room please.





Friday October 4, 2019 8:00am - 5:30pm
Crescent A 311 W Peltason Dr, Irvine, CA 92697

8:05am

All-Day Bus Schedule October 4, 2019
CLS is providing bus transportation to UC Irvine from the Hyatt Regency John Wayne Newport Beach. In order to arrive before the 9:00 AM keynote, please, wait outside the Hyatt at 8:00 AM to secure a spot in one of the three buses departing between 8:05 and 8:15 AM. A CLS staff member will assist you to board the bus. Upon arrival to campus, signage will direct you to the UCI Student Center.

Bus service is provided all day.

Friday, Oct 4 - Hyatt Departure to UCI
8:00 AM - Meet up in front of hotel to board the bus.
9:05 AM
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11:05 AM
11:20 AM
11:40 AM
12:05 PM
12:20 PM
1:15 PM
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2:45 PM
3:15 PM
3:45 PM
4:15 PM
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Friday, Oct 4 - UCI Departure to Hyatt
9:35 AM
9:55 AM
10:15 AM
10:35 AM
10:55 AM
11:15 AM
11:35 AM
11:55 AM
12:15 PM
12:35 PM
1:45 PM
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Friday October 4, 2019 8:05am - 7:45pm

9:00am

Keynote with Eve Ewing
Dr. Eve L. Ewing is a sociologist of education and a writer from Chicago. She is the author, most recently, of the poetry collection 1919 and the nonfiction work Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago's South Side. Her first book, the poetry collection Electric Arches, received awards from the American Library Association and the Poetry Society of America and was named one of the year's best books by NPR and the Chicago Tribune. She is the co-author (with Nate Marshall) of the play No Blue Memories: The Life of Gwendolyn Brooks. She also writes the Ironheart series as well as other projects for Marvel Comics. Ewing is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. Her work has been published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Times, and many other venues.

Speakers
EE

Eve Ewing

Assistant Professor, University of Chicago


Friday October 4, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:00am

AM Coffee and Tea
Come enjoy some coffee/tea and pastries before the featured event!

Friday October 4, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am
Pacific D Ballroom Patio

10:15am

Connecting Learning Across Settings
I'm Teaching This for the Culture!: Examining Creative Capacity and Change Agency of Hip-Hop Educators Under Constraints and Uncertainty
Jabari Miles Evans
Hip-Hop Based Education, the usage of Hip-Hop practices and pedagogy in urban classrooms, has been argued by many researchers as very beneficial to understanding how to improve the educational disparities of urban youth in low income environments. More particularly, Hip-Hop music making activities have been described by many scholars as beneficial to several supplementary and after-school programs. While music educators might previously have been halted by concerns about appropriateness of lyrics and themes in Hip-Hop albums, a music classroom focused on composing original pieces while developing musical skills and understandings relevant to Hip-Hop music could prove meaningful to future academic and vocational aspirations of students. However, if public school systems are unaccepting of the “organic” and unstructured nature of Hip-Hop culture (language, style, dress, and its resistance to the status quo) how can Hip-Hop practices still be used substantially within the classroom? This paper examines the constraints and ideological conflict when teaching Hip-Hop music production in the formal music classroom. Focusing on pedagogical work of the teaching artists within a school based Hip-Hop music program in an urban school district, this article is a case study analysis of four teaching adult facilitators who support youth as they actively participate in school-based Hip-Hop making practices. By using the narratives of these teachers as units of analysis, qualitative methods were used to view the actions and decisions of teachers within this program. This study reveals how administrative expectations placed upon instructors can greatly influence how the learning in Hip-Hop programs is, or is not, taking place. The findings suggest many schools may endorse Hip-Hop music production programs merely to present a guise of inclusiveness and makes suggestions for how music instructors can combat this challenge in the future.

A Toolkit for Analyzing Teaching and Learning Across Contexts
Jeffrey Holmes, Earl Aguilera, Kelly M Tran
This session explicates a theoretical perspective which addresses the complexities of moving across teaching and learning contexts in everyday life, both in formal settings such as school but also informal settings, and between physical and virtual spaces. While the education research community has made important progress toward understanding learning in a variety of formal and informal contexts, less emphasis has been placed on understanding how teaching and learning experiences can be connected across these contexts and about the variety of teaching and teachers that are essential to them. We outline an analytic perspective called distributed teaching and learning systems (DTALS) which augments other models of learning by stressing the importance of movements across contexts and foregrounds teaching as a key feature alongside learning. We then provide a set of tools for analyzing pedagogical situations through a DTALS perspective, and a brief worked example of the tools in action.

The Promise of Using Media to Engage Young Children and Their Parents in Science
Megan Silander, Michelle Cerrone, Leslie Cuellar, Lindsey Hiebert, Jennifer Stiles
The achievement gap begins well before children enter kindergarten. Research has shown that children who start school having missed critical early learning opportunities are already at risk for academic failure. This project seeks to narrow this gap by finding new avenues for bringing early science experiences to preschool children (ages 3-5), particularly those living in communities with few resources. This study examines the promise of using media to help young children and their families, both English and Spanish-speaking, engage in science in the context of home visiting programs. During the study, low-income families who were enrolled in home visiting programs tested an app-based intervention that explored ramps, colors, and sounds over the course of three months through hands-on activities, rich media experiences, and supports for parents and educators. The research described in this paper investigates whether the intervention improves the capacity of parent/caregivers to support young children's learning in science. Ultimately this research aims to build practical and theoretical understanding of: 1) effective media-based family engagement models in science learning; 2) the types of supports that families and home educators need to implement these models.

Speakers
MC

Michelle Cerrone

Research Associate, EDC Center for Children and Technology
avatar for Kelly M Tran

Kelly M Tran

Assistant Professor, High Point University
PhD Student at Arizona State University.
avatar for Megan Silander

Megan Silander

Research Scientist, EDC, Center for Children and Technology
JH

Jeffrey Holmes

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
avatar for Jabari Miles Evans

Jabari Miles Evans

Doctoral Candidate, Northwestern University
EA

Earl Aguilera

Assistant Professor, California State University, Fresno


Friday October 4, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Doheny Beach B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

Leveling Up the Online Creation and Sharing Ecosystem
Teaching Young People to Communicate (Better) Online
Michelle Ciccone


Communicating online effectively, positively, and powerfully is essential, for personal and professional success, as well as for the forward movement of our democracy. This showcase will explore best practices for addressing the online communication skills of young people, and will get you thinking about how you can explore this topic in your own classroom context.

The Museum of Me: Exploring and Exhibiting Identity With the Video Game, “What Remains of Edith Finch”
Matthew Farber, Susan E Rivers, Paul Darvasi, Michelle Bertoli


There are currently few appealing, developmentally appropriate methods for engaging teens in their own social and emotional learning. Commercial video games offer rich, mediated, interactive narrative experiences that can be integrated into the classroom to support teen students’ core academic knowledge as well as their social and emotional resilience. We used the award-winning video game and digital “museum,” “What Remains of Edith Finch,” as the basis for a curricular unit to engage high school students in building literacy skills as well as key aspects of resilience including autonomy and self-awareness. “What Remains of Edith Finch” tells the story of an 18-year-old girl's ostensibly cursed family history through the mechanic of exploring her childhood home, which has become a museum preserving the identities of her family members, most of whom have succumbed to tragic fates.

This digital museum can be used in educational settings to explore with teens how they become aware of and represent their identities publicly and privately through a series of lessons that include gameplay and cover topics including: how objects can be used to define and perform identity; self-expression on social media; healthy and unhealthy coping mechanisms and the labels associated with them; family and social influences on identity formation; questions of diversity and sociocultural differences in understandings and expressions of identity; the impact of choices on identity and questions of fixed versus malleable traits. The session will describe methods for integrating existing digital games into instruction to support teens’ holistic development.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Ciccone

Michelle Ciccone

Technology Integration Specialist, Foxborough Public Schools
Michelle Ciccone is an educator, curriculum developer, and researcher passionate about digital literacy, media literacy, and digital citizenship. She is currently the Technology Integration Specialist at Foxborough High School in Foxborough, Massachusetts. In this position, Michelle... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Farber

Matthew Farber

Assistant Professor, University of Northern Colorado
Matthew Farber, Ed.D. is an assistant professor of Technology, Innovation, and Pedagogy at the University of Northern Colorado. He has been invited to the White House, to keynote for UNESCO, and he has been interviewed about games and learning by NPR, Fox News Radio, USA Today, and... Read More →
avatar for Paul Darvasi

Paul Darvasi

Teacher, Royal St. George's College
Paul Darvasi is an educator, game designer, speaker, and writer whose work looks at the intersection of games, culture and learning. He teaches English and media studies in Toronto, Canada and is a doctoral candidate at York University. His research explores how commercial video games... Read More →


Friday October 4, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Doheny Beach A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

Connected Learning Across Socio-Cultural Borders: Designing to Support Immigrant Parents
This symposium brings together researchers and practitioners to share cutting edge initiatives that support immigrant parents’ participation in connected learning environments. From a connected learning perspective, it is essential for young people to have the support of a network of peers, teachers, and parents facilitating their pursuit of personal interests or passions, as well as their ability to link these experiences to academic achievement. While there has been a growing interest in exploring the role of parents in these networks, we are just beginning to understand how parents from non-dominant backgrounds such as immigrants and refugees fit in this picture. These groups’ differences from the norm often keep them in conditions of extreme information poverty, complicating their ability to harness resources for advancing their children’s lives. Against this background, in this symposium we highlight the strategies of resilience and unique funds of knowledge that immigrant parents have developed which might serve as an inspiration for connected learning initiatives. This symposium will feature five approaches to supporting immigrant parents as connected parents, ranging from exploring the potential of intergenerational parent-children online interactions to articulating the precise role of technology in the information ecology of immigrant parents to methods for designing and deploying assets-based interventions for these parents. We conclude by opening the discussion to the audience about how to expand the vision of connected learning to populations with non-dominant information and technology practices.

Speakers
avatar for Betsy DiSalvo

Betsy DiSalvo

Associate Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology
Dr. Betsy DiSalvo is an Associate Professor in the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Institute of Technology. At Georgia Tech she leads the Culture and Technology (CAT) Lab, where they study cultural values and how those values impact technology use, learning, and production... Read More →
avatar for Ricarose Roque

Ricarose Roque

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Boulder
avatar for Alexander Cho

Alexander Cho

UC President's Postdoctoral Fellow, Connected Learning Lab / UC Irvine
I'm a digital media researcher/designer, cultural anthroplogist, and critical theorist studying digital media and race/gender/sexuality.
avatar for Marisol Wong-Villacres

Marisol Wong-Villacres

PhD Candidate, Georgia Institute of Technology
Marisol Wong-Villacres is an Ecuadorian mother of two who also happens to be a Ph.D. student in Human-Centered Computing at Georgia Tech. Using ethnographic and participatory methods, in the last three years she has worked with Hispanic immigrant parents in envisioning technologies... Read More →
avatar for Wendy Roldan

Wendy Roldan

PhD Student, University of Washington
Family learning, equity in HCI and engineering education
ER

Emily Roden

Co-founder and CEO, ReadyRosie


Friday October 4, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Doheny Beach C/D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

The Future Is Now: Games as Assessment
Our symposium will be structured around how games can not only cultivate, but assess future-facing skills (popularly known as 21st century skills). Our discussion will consist of three pillars:

The Problem
Today, there exists growing awareness that the future will require of us “non-cognitive” or “21st century skills.” However, school as it’s currently structured militates against developing these skills. Standardized testing emphasizes individual achievement over collaboration. Siloed instruction does not promote synthesis of ideas from different domains. And a growing trend of treating education as vocational training favors narrow skills over broader understanding. Once we’ve established the landscape of existing hindrances to the cultivation of 21st century skills, we will begin to explore examples of how games can help to modernize the teaching and assessment of these competencies.

How Games Can Help
Next, we’ll discuss how games can be utilized as tools to both promote and assess key future-ready skills through the lens of four unique titles developed by FableVision Studios, Filament Games, and the MIT Education Arcade.

Challenges Ahead
Following an in-depth exploration of the examples detailed in part two, our panelists will assess what the future holds for game-based learning in terms of future-facing skills assessment. How do we assess these key 21st century skills in ways that are accountable? How do we convey to game players that these skills are transferable to the real world? Our panel of experts will ponder questions like these as they prognosticate what lies ahead for game-based teaching and assessment of future-ready skills.

Speakers
avatar for Scot Osterweil

Scot Osterweil

Creative Director, MIT Education Arcade/Game Lab
Scot Osterweil is Creative Director of the Education Arcade in the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program. He has designed award-winning games in both academic and commercial environments, focusing on what is authentically playful in challenging academic subjects. Designs include the... Read More →
avatar for Louisa Rosenheck

Louisa Rosenheck

Associate Director, MIT Playful Journey Lab
Louisa Rosenheck is the Associate Director and Creative Lead of the MIT Playful Journey Lab. She manages the design, content, and development of educational games and software, and oversees the research on how ed tech can be effectively used in both formal and informal educational... Read More →
avatar for Dan White

Dan White

CEO, Filament Games
PS

Peter Stidwill

Executive Producer, FableVision Studios


Friday October 4, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Emerald Bay D/E 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

Design With Purpose: Rapid Prototyping, Design Thinking and Digital Badging for Engagement and Equity
In this workshop, participants will practice Human-Centered Design by engaging in a fun, hands-on micro-cycle of the process, using fellow workshop participants as design subjects.

Using Mouse’s Design League program as a model, participants will practice meaningful information gathering strategies, or “problem finding skills,” learn to frame questions for brainstorming, hone their creative ideation skills and create a rapid prototype of a product idea using craft supplies and digital tools and gift it to their user/fellow workshop participant.

We will also be exploring ways to meaningfully capture and leverage this kind of student design work and learning using badges and digital portfolios.

This workshop will be highly interactive, hands on, and insightful for educators who are interested in incorporating Human-Centered Design skills into their own content development or directly into student practice. It will also be informative for those interested in using badges as a credential, a tool to improve access to higher education, for underrepresented youth or students who may have unique strengths and abilities best highlighted by a portfolio system when compared to traditional pathways for entering higher education.

Speakers
avatar for Maggie Muldoon

Maggie Muldoon

Design League Manager, Mouse
Maggie is a New York based visual artist and educator who has been working in maker education, learning design and creative technology for over 12 years.She joined the Mouse team in 2011 and currently serves as the Senior Manager of Design League where she works groups with high school... Read More →


Friday October 4, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Emerald Bay B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

Lowering the Floors for Remixable Learning Design
Designing creative, connected learning experiences often requires more preparation than traditional approaches to teaching and learning. While some resources exist to support designers and educators, it remains difficult to adapt and remix existing resources. In particular, it can be challenging to understand the context in which a resource or activity might have been used or the rationale behind design decisions, raising challenges to adaptation to other contexts.

In this workshop, participants will explore ways to design for remixability i.e. to approach learning design in ways that encourage and facilitate sharing and adaptation of resources. In particular, participants will prototype design approaches that might lower the floors for sharing, remixing, and opening up the thinking behind learning designs. They’ll have the chance to workshop their prototypes and to reflect on tradeoffs, tensions, and principles that might guide future efforts to design for remixability.

Speakers
YA

Yusuf Ahmad

Research Assistant, MIT Media Lab


Friday October 4, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Emerald Bay C 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:15am

State of Sound: Recording Community
State of Sound is a North Carolina State University Libraries initiative. It invites the NC State sound making community to share their work and hear the work of others. Whatever sounds the community is making - music, podcasts, oral histories, anything recorded with intention - is welcome to be shared. Understanding and practicing recording sound can lead to stories and ideas being shared to wider audiences faster, can foster creative collaborations, can showcase innovative work, and can build communities of sound makers that motivate one another to develop media communication skills.

In this workshop, two North Carolina State University Librarians will lead attendees through hands-on activities which make use of innovative and accessible sound making and recording technologies and practices. The first activity - Songwriting in 15 Minutes - will result in everyone in the room writing, recording, and sharing a song to State of Sound in a very short amount of time. The second activity - Making Music with Music - puts attendees behind the decks in a DJ workshop, showing how records and recorded sounds are accessible instruments that can be remixed to share new ideas. All technology will be provided.

At the end of the workshop attendees will have a greater understanding of and appreciation for accessible sound making, sharing, and recording technologies and practices. They will see how stories can be told and how creative work can be showcased using these accessible technologies. And they will see how the State of Sound model inspires community, collaboration, and creativity through sound making.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Evans Groth

Jason Evans Groth

Digital Media Librarian, North Carolina State University
Jason Evans Groth is a Digital Media Librarian at NCSU Libraries. As part of the Learning Spaces and Services department he helps to support the eleven audio and video production suites and several other high-tech creative multimedia spaces. He earned his MIS/MLS from the School of... Read More →
AV

Alex Valencia

North Carolina State University Libraries Fellow, North Carolina State University


Friday October 4, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Emerald Bay A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:15am

AM Break
Friday October 4, 2019 11:15am - 11:30am
Pacific D Ballroom Patio

11:30am

Hall of Failure
There Is No Reason This Should Have Failed, and Yet…: A Story of Blogs and Educator Professional Learning
Emily Schindler


This presentation tells the story of the failure of blogging in the Wisconsin Teacher Studio, a maker-based professional learning group for educators. Despite the ample expertise, experience, and well-intentioned design, a blogging site, meant to connect professional development participants between monthly meetings, failed spectacularly. This presentation will detail possible reasons for failure, and what it tells us about the design and implementation of connective platforms for educator learning. Ultimately, this failure is instructive for future designs (digital and social), which must always consider interest-based learner participation as a starting point, even when those learners are also teachers.

Summertime Blues: Building Teaching Capacity Through Informal Summer Learning Experiences
Joe Diaz, Claudia Urrea


The MIT STEAM Camp brings MIT’s “Mens et Manus” approach to learning to children. Students work together, designing and building innovative projects that they can share with their communities and families. During the camp, they engage in hands-on activities and explore the use of digital technologies and tools that promote creativity, invention, and collaboration. This program has also been a vehicle for hands-on teacher professional development for educators who work alongside MIT staff to both develop and facilitate camp activities. Our goal is to allow Hong Kong-based teachers to learn from the MIT community while also supplying their own expertise about local learning conditions and areas of interest. Additionally, this program has provided us with the opportunity to develop a framework for the MIT K-12 community to come together to design curriculum and facilitate the program all while drawing inspiration from the UN Sustainable Development Goals (themes included “Energy” and “Into The Water”).

The MIT STEAM Camp has successfully engaged local students and teachers and the MIT community in a learning experience. It has been offered for two years to more than 400 students and 50 teachers from different kinds of schools in Hong Kong. They have provided important feedback and recommendations to improve future instances of the Camp. However, this process has not been seamless. In this paper, we reflect upon our model for building teacher capacity and research efforts. We describe our ultimate goals as well as our successes and failures in trying to move those components forward.

STEM Reform and the Holy Grail
Bob Coulter

Many STEM reform efforts are motivated by something of a grail quest — a well-intended effort to enable rich and complex learning environments to take root in contexts where such outcomes have persistently been difficult to achieve. In this session, an analytic framework developed by best-selling historian Yuval Noah Harari guides a post-mortem of a recently completed NSF ITEST project engaging 9-11 year old students with agent-based modeling. While there were a number of successes in the classroom and the research team gained a number of valuable insights, there were strategic limitations relating to technology use, policy frameworks, and participant identity which need to be accommodated in framing future endeavors.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Coulter

Bob Coulter

Director, Liztsinger Road Ecology Center
I spend most of my time thinking about ways to get kids excited about learning and taking action in the community. A good part of this involves games they design with MIT's Taleblazer and StarLogo Nova tools, or in playing Equations, a really cool math game.
avatar for Emily Schindler

Emily Schindler

Doctoral Candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison
CU

Claudia Urrea

Associate Director, pK-12, MIT Abdul Latif Jameel World Education Lab (J-WEL)
JD

Joe Diaz

Program Coordinator, pK-12 Action Group, MIT Open Learning


Friday October 4, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Doheny Beach C/D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Learning Sciences and Media
Connected Learning During Disconnected Moments?
Hong-An Wu

This paper questions two common educational discourses that argues and advocates for the continual and further adoption of emerging technologies in the name of benefiting student learning by pointing out two specific unverified and perhaps unverifiable assumptions in these narratives: the position of technologies as obedient tools to serve higher-order cognitive functions and the position of technologies as coherent and bounded objects traversing through pedagogical exchanges. Afterward, this paper provides a provocation of how we, as educators and researchers, might move forward in addressing knowledge production around learning with technologies through the examination of moments when technologies don’t work.

Interests, Relationships, and Opportunities Within the 2018 Global Minecraft Mentor Program
Mathew Farber, Mia Kim Williams
Minecraft: Education Edition (Microsoft, 2016) has become a critical tool for learning for many classrooms, connecting students and teachers in game-based activity (Dikkers, 2015; Kafai & Burke, 2016). On the Minecraft: Education Edition website, a teacher can connect with mentors, review shared lessons, and download maps of generated worlds. In 2017 Microsoft Education launched the Global Minecraft Mentor Program to support teaching, learning, and innovation with the game. This research explores and describes this mentor space from the perspective of the participants. It seeks to understand the experiences of mentors within this space, entry points to onboard teachers who have little or no background in adapting Minecraft: Education Edition to their classrooms, and the extent to which connected learning principles manifest in the mentoring space. Research followed an explanatory sequential mixed method design. Two phases of data collection in this study beginning with quantitative data collection and analysis; the quantitative findings will inform the development and deployment of the qualitative data collection and analysis (Creswell, 2015). Data included survey responses, interview responses, artifacts provided by interview participants, and artifacts related to the Global Minecraft Mentor Program website.
Outputs & Insights From 12 Years of Game-Based Learning Research at the Danube-University Krems’ Center for Applied Game Studies
Nikolaus Koenig, Alexander Pfeiffer

For almost 12 years, the Center for Applied Game Studies at the Danube-University Krems, Austria, has conducted game-based learning research. Guided by the aim to enable classroom integration of game-based learning on a broad scale, this research has centered on the development of a gbl-toolkit for (and in cooperation with) teachers, enabling them to use game-based learning strategies within the context of current educational practice, while at the same time expanding their own knowledge and skills as gbl-experts. Currently, the toolkit contains tools to evaluate the pedagogical potential of digital games, to plan and conduct gbl-projects, and to exchange with other teachers and form an active gbl-community. The current step consists of the development of an educational game design tool and the first in a series of educational game editors for teachers. The talk will present these tools and discuss lessons learned from their development.

Speakers
HA

Hong-An (Ann) Wu

Assistant Professor, University of Texas at Dallas
avatar for Matthew Farber

Matthew Farber

Assistant Professor, University of Northern Colorado
Matthew Farber, Ed.D. is an assistant professor of Technology, Innovation, and Pedagogy at the University of Northern Colorado. He has been invited to the White House, to keynote for UNESCO, and he has been interviewed about games and learning by NPR, Fox News Radio, USA Today, and... Read More →
AP

Alexander Pfeiffer

Senior Researcher, MIT
NK

Nikolaus Koenig

Researcher, Danube-University


Friday October 4, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Doheny Beach B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Immersive Learning Experiences
Building History 3.0 Project
Randall Fujimoto, Janet Chen, Kim Bathker, Renee Tajima-Peña


Building History 3.0 is an interactive web project that uses the 3D construction and exploration online video game Minecraft to engage young people and the public with the historic meaning of World War II Japanese American incarceration camps. It was created to engage the public--especially young people--with the historic meaning of World War II Japanese American incarceration camps. It explores the ways different generations have reclaimed and interpreted these sites, not only as places of trauma, but also of community building, creative expression, and learning. The preservation, dialogue, and understanding of these moments in history are increasingly important for students to understand.

Far more than a straightforward history lesson, Building History 3.0 encourages students to explore themes of civil liberties, democracy, immigration, and civic engagement. Young people sometimes perceive history lessons to be boring, placing emphasis on the memorization of facts, dates, and ready-made concepts. We aim to encourage young people to learn independently, investigate sources, think critically about history, and to analyze multiple perspectives. Building History 3.0 provides a platform for students to explore the balancing of national priorities with the rights of individuals and minority groups, the meaning of constitutional protections and the Bill of Rights in our daily lives, how democratic processes are strengthened or weakened during times of national crisis, and assessing the representation of racial and ethnic groups.

Mission HydroSci: Educational Game Meets the Classroom
James Laffey, Troy Sadler, Sean Goggins, Joe Griffin, Justin Sigoloff, Eric Wulff, Andrew Womack, Wenyi Lu


Mission HydroSci (MHS) teaches water systems and scientific argumentation towards meeting Next Generation Science Standards. MHS is a game-based 3D virtual environment for enacting transformational role-playing, wherein students must learn new knowledge and competencies in order to successfully complete the game missions. MHS was developed for middle school science as a replacement unit of about 6 to 8 hours and uses analytics and a teacher dashboard to help teachers support their students.

The MHS game provides an active learning environment for meeting these learning objectives by engaging students in a narrative about needing to investigate water resources and use scientific argumentation to complete missions critical to the survival and accomplishments of the members of their scientific enterprise. Along with the narrative gameplay MHS includes learning progressions for water systems science and scientific argumentation, a visually exciting environment, substantial interaction and feedback, and applies transformational role-playing as an approach to integrate learning within gameplay.

We plan a field test using a randomized control trial (RCT) to rigorously evaluate the impact of MHS game play. The RCT will be undertaken in Winter, 2019. However, to test the feasibility of conducting a large field test in classrooms we undertook a feasibility field test in the Spring of 2018. This showcase describes MHS, represents our process for developing MHS, and presents some insights and lessons learned about the use of MHS in classrooms including excerpts from interviews with the12 teachers who participated in the 2018 feasibility testing.

ARG-in-a-Box: Challenges in Designing an Anytime, Anywhere Science-Themed Alternate Reality and Augmented Reality Game for Middle School Youth
Scot Osterweil, Caitlin Feeley

Alternate reality games (ARG) and location-based augmented reality (AR) games leverage their ability to overlay narrative along with a digital layer of information onto real-world contexts, allowing players to investigate real and fictional phenomena and offering players meaningful choices, making them ideal tools for engaging youth in science education. However, both genres can be challenging to implement in educational settings (e.g., schools, museums, and out-of-school programs), for both the game designer (e.g., requiring real time behind-the-scenes facilitation of the ARG), as well as the game facilitator (e.g., customizing activities and/or the location-based AR game for their local setting). This paper describes a new approach, ARG-in-a-Box, along with the two goals of this project, (1) iteratively designing an “ARG in-a-Box” prototype which engages youth in scientific thinking through a series of related activities, and (2) describing the design and technological infrastructure necessary to support this anytime/anywhere approach.


Speakers
avatar for Caitlin Feeley

Caitlin Feeley

Educational Game Designer, MIT
Caitlin is a designer of award winning educational games. Her projects have included "Vanished," a transmedia science mystery game/event co-developed with the Smithsonian, as well as the financial literacy games “Farm Blitz,” “Bite Club,” and "Con 'Em if You Can" with Fablevision... Read More →
avatar for Scot Osterweil

Scot Osterweil

Creative Director, MIT Education Arcade/Game Lab
Scot Osterweil is Creative Director of the Education Arcade in the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program. He has designed award-winning games in both academic and commercial environments, focusing on what is authentically playful in challenging academic subjects. Designs include the... Read More →
JG

Joe Griffin

University of Missouri
avatar for James Laffey

James Laffey

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
avatar for Kim Bathker

Kim Bathker

Ed Tech Specialist + Science Teacher/Chair, Building History 3.0 Project
As an EdTech specialist, high school science teacher/chair, and STEM program coordinator, Kim is passionate about empowering young people—and finding innovative ways to do that. She earned her B.S. in Neuroscience from UCLA and also holds a M.S. in Education Media Design and Technology... Read More →
avatar for Randall Fujimoto

Randall Fujimoto

Game-Based Learning Designer, GameTrain Learning, Inc.
Randall Fujimoto is the executive director of GameTrain Learning, an educational nonprofit organization that promotes game-based learning in schools and organizations. Randall has been creating game-based educational and training programs for over 10 years, prior to which he was an... Read More →
JS

Justin Sigoloff

Creative Director, Adroit Studiots, University of Missouri, Columbia
avatar for Janet Chen

Janet Chen

Project Producer + Assistant Director, Building History 3.0 Project + UCLA Center for EthnoCommunications
Janet Chen’s work fosters community engagement and supports underrepresented and marginalized communities. She is a filmmaker, organizer and educator. She has worked for UCLA, UCI, Visual Communications and Outfest. Janet is currently the assistant director for the Center for EthnoCommunications... Read More →
avatar for Renee Tajima-Peña

Renee Tajima-Peña

Project Director + Professor, Building History 3.0 Project + UCLA Center for EthnoCommunications
Project Director, Building History 3.0: An interactive exploration of Japanese American Incarceration Camps Through Minecraft. Documentary filmmaker, UCLA professor of Asian American Studies and director of the Center for EthnoCommunications.


Friday October 4, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Doheny Beach A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Scaled Platforms for Kids Creativity
What does it take to scale innovative platforms designed to ignite and nurture kids’ creativity? What kinds of market forces must be considered? What are the keys to sustainability? This panel brings together some of the brightest minds behind platforms like Roblox, Scratch, BrainPop, Gamestar Mechanic, and TwoBit Circus to discuss what has worked (and what hasn’t!) in bringing their creative tools to scale.

Speakers
KS

Katie Salen

University of California, Irvine
avatar for Allisyn Levy

Allisyn Levy

VP, Product Lead, BrainPOP
Since joining BrainPOP in 2007, Allisyn Levy has played an integral role in the creation, launch, and continued development of BrainPOP Educators, our online professional community. Now, as Vice President, GameUp, she leads outreach efforts for BrainPOP's online learning games portal... Read More →
avatar for Alan Gershenfeld

Alan Gershenfeld

President, E-Line Media
Alan is President and Co-Founder of E-Line Media, a leading publisher of games that engage, educate and empower. Alan was previously a member of the executive team that rebuilt game publisher Activision from bankruptcy into an industry leader. He has spoken on games and social impact... Read More →
avatar for Champika Fernando

Champika Fernando

Director of Outreach, Scratch
Champika Fernando is part of the Scratch Team at the MIT Media Lab. She has worked as an engineer and designer and is currently focused on how to best support the use of Scratch as a creative coding tool.
avatar for Leah Hanes

Leah Hanes

Executive Director, TwoBit Circus
avatar for Genevieve C. Johnson

Genevieve C. Johnson

Senior Instructional Designer, Roblox
Genevieve Johnson is the senior instructional designer for Roblox, the world's largest user-generated social platform for play. In her role, she oversees creation of educational content and advises educators worldwide on how to use Roblox in STEAM based learning programs. Her work... Read More →


Friday October 4, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Pacific Ballroom A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

City Settlers: Sustainability Education Through Embodied Participatory Simulations in Classrooms
Understanding complex systems is a critically valuable skill across many domains, particularly in sustainability education Participatory simulations have often been used to provide learners with an “insider” perspective of complex systems – especially illuminating the emergence of certain behaviours as a result of local motivations.
In this workshop, we invite attendees to playtest City Settlers – an embodied participatory simulation where participants control city-level systems and manage interdependent resources like materials, pollution, and people in a network of cities (controlled by "competing" players), in a classroom. This simulation is intended to provide a rich testbed for learners to build their understandings of complex systems, environmental education, as well as negotiation skills – where they figure out ways to negotiate and communicate shared as well as competing goals among each other.
We also plan to share the kinds of data that a simulation of this kind generates from players (including play data, audio data, as well as in-class location data). This will be used to brainstorm ideas on how such data can be used for providing formative information to educators – about the kinds of productive collaborations taking place in their classrooms, and how to foster a greater variety of rich collaborative learning.

Speakers
avatar for Vishesh Kumar

Vishesh Kumar

Doctoral Candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Friday October 4, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Connected Learning Guide: Putting Theory Into Practice
The Chicago Learning Exchange has developed a Connected Learning Guide that translates that research into a one-stop reference for educators, mentors, and other youth-serving professionals. Connected learning is a model for youth engagement and includes a set of powerful design principles based on research into the kinds of experiences that sustain and deepen youth learning. Engagement matters because it is the key sign of a person’s own motivation to learn.

Attendees will use the Connected Learning Guide as a tool to reflect upon their own practice, to identify their strengths, and to gain some practical guidance in areas where they would like to build their knowledge and skills. In the spirit of connected learning, this workshop will help you learn from and contribute to the wisdom of your peers.

Registrants are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the guide before the workshop. Find the latest version of the guide at https://chicagolx.org/resources/connected-learning-guide.

Speakers
avatar for Gina Grant

Gina Grant

Director of Community, Chicago Learning Exchange
I’m a connector.
KL

Kiley Larson

Principal Researcher, Kansas City Social Innovation Center
avatar for Sam Dyson

Sam Dyson

Consultant and Cofounder, Chicago Learning Exchange
I like to design and facilitate learning experiences that help people put their vision into action. Let's connect!


Friday October 4, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay C 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:30am

Creating Media With and for Youth That Does Not Suck. Come Help Public Media Continue to Work With Youth and Foster Connected Learning Experiences
The Corporation for Public Broadcasting has been funding a Professional Learning Community for 8 public media stations to convene, brainstorm, and collaborate on innovative ways to make media with and for youth. Each station is exploring unique partnerships with youth in their communities, resulting in media that reaches a large audience. This work promotes youth voice while also providing opportunities for youth to be contributors to the programs at their local public media station. KQED, PBS SoCal, Wisconsin Public TV, and WGBH will engage in an open roundtable discussion about the work they are doing with and for youth around creating quality content that does not suck. Attendees will help these public media stations work through obstacles in their programs with youth, brainstorm effective strategies for media-making in partnership with youth, and incorporate best practices from Connected Learning research and programming. Come and be part of engaging youth voice in public media at this open forum and workshop. You will have the opportunity to contribute to youth programming that reaches millions of people.

Speakers
avatar for Hillary Wells

Hillary Wells

Director of Youth Media, WGBH Educational Foundation
I work for WGBH (public media) and focus on developing media content for and about youth ages 8-18. I care deeply that the youth voice is heard and appreciate the range of possible platforms for authentic and meaningful expression of who we are individually and collectively. The song... Read More →
DS

Denise Sauerteig

Learning & Evaluation Manager, KQED


Friday October 4, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

12:30pm

Lunch
We will provide a hot lunch. Vegan and vegetarian options available.

Friday October 4, 2019 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Pacific D Ballroom Patio

1:00pm

Q&A with CLS Proceedings Co-Editors Remi Kalir and Danielle Filipiak
 Come meet with Remi Kalir and Danielle Filipiak, Co-Editors of the 2019 Proceedings of the Connected Learning Summit. This lunchtime session will feature an informative presentation and Q&A. Remi and Danielle will explain how your presentation at CLS can appear in the open-access proceedings (thanks ETC Press!). This informal session will review the process and timeline for submitting to the proceedings, and will also answer any of your questions. Grab your lunch and join us!

Speakers
DF

Danielle Filipiak

Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut
RK

Remi Kalir

Assistant Professor, CU Denver


Friday October 4, 2019 1:00pm - 1:45pm
Pacific Ballroom A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

Game-Based Learning Across Disciplines
Using Connected Learning Design Principles to Further Co-Create a Critical Speech Therapy Game   Jared Duval
Therapy can be costly, time-consuming, repetitive, and difficult. Games have the power to teach transferable skills, can turn repetitive tasks into engaging mechanics, have been proven to be effective at delivering various forms of therapy, and can be deployed at large scales. Therapy games represent fertile ground for connected learning. In this work, we collaborate with 7 children with corrected cleft palate aged 2-10 and their parents during their yearly visit to UC Davis Medical center to co-create and evaluate SpokeIt, a speech therapy game. Each of these children come from low socioeconomic statuses with limited access to speech therapy and would benefit from the amplified opportunities of new media in connected learning. Throughout the study, we ran multiple cascading participatory design sessions using design principals of connected learning, which culminated in the design of two new medium fidelity prototypes presented in this paper.

Game Play and Game Design to Enhance Design Thinking in Entrepreneurship Education
Wilian Gatti Junior
In this conceptual paper, we present a contribution to game-based learning and design thinking which translates to teaching and learning practices. We have designed a pedagogical intervention based on a board game to engage learners and mediate the design thinking learning process in entrepreneurship education. We draw upon the idea that the entrepreneurial activity is intrinsically related to designers’ work. However, this approach requires a change in the way business schools handle design thinking, in particular, its cognitive aspect. Our intervention will allow us to examine learners’ rationality in design thinking by taking three distinctive roles. In the first role, students as gamers will employ their cognition to design and execute their strategy to overcome their opponents considering a general approach and emergent strategies that will arise from changes in the economic scenario and from his/her opponents' decisions. Then, after students have played the game, they will roleplay as designers, working in groups to redesign the played game. In the last role, students as potential entrepreneurs, we will see how learners design a business model that encompasses the product (the game), the technology applied on it, and the customers’ desire. By combining the three roles, it is possible to analyze the design thinking development and cognition applied and the impact of the intervention in students’ comprehension about entrepreneurship. Our pedagogical intervention can be positioned as a mediational artifact to support reflection and analysis with expected positive outcomes for both deep learning and engagement.

Speakers
JD

Jared Duval

University of California, Santa Cruz
avatar for Wilian Gatti Junior

Wilian Gatti Junior

PhD Candidate, University of Calgary


Friday October 4, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Doheny Beach B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

Locative Media and Community Engagement
Connecting to Place Through STUDIO: Mobile City Science
Erin Riesland, Don LaBonte


Our team set out to design and implement an afterschool curriculum that leverages spatial and locative technologies to explore youth connections to community and place. Located in a recently revitalized HOPE IV neighborhood (Housing For People Everywhere) historically synonymous with crime and inequity, we worked with middle and high school youth as part of an afterschool STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) program. Youth were presented with a series of spatial “learning on the move” (Taylor, 2013) activities that made use of mobile technologies and were guided by undergraduate mentors. In the field, youth took immersive 360 images which were then uploaded into a virtual building space. Through our curriculum, we aimed to challenge rhetoric around technology’s role as an agent of displacement and isolation. Youth worked collaboratively with near peer mentors across technologies to re-present, create, and inscribe themselves into locative technologies that mediate place. Final projects combined common location-aware technologies and virtual reality (VR) creation software. Google Earth walks in VR inspired new perspectives of community while virtual painting provided a way to create 3D materials to add into the VR world-building platform. Together these mundane and novel locative technologies enabled youth to inscribe themselves back into place-making and place-learning technologies. Google Maps was used to trace and curate youth’s real and virtual experiences and creations. Youth’s immersive virtual worlds were shared using smartphones and Google Cardboard viewers.

Neighborhood Circulation of Civic Stories: A Trans-Local Platform
Benjamin Stokes, Olivia Williams, Hazel Arroyo


How can cities make their history more visible, and invite residents to participate across channels? This project investigates a transmedia "storytelling system" for neighborhoods, designed to circulate audio stories and digital photographs beyond institutional walls. Residents often discovered the system at one of five neighborhood libraries, each featuring a "satellite exhibit" of a Smithsonian exhibit on DC neighborhood history. A novel transmedia design extended the physical installations, yet remained deliberately low-tech. In particular, the system featured repurposed payphones, a storytelling truck, and a multimedia texting system to connect key sites around the city. The system recruited residents’ own stories of neighborhood history, even as it circulated specific oral histories from city archives. Print media like postcards proved essential for scavenger hunts and learning activities, shaping playful experiences around neighborhood stories. Over 18 months, the project demonstrated how connected learning at the neighborhood level can prioritize inclusion by balancing transmedia organizing with locally-owned platforms.

Exploring STEM Impact and Engagement in Student-Led and Purpose-Driven Projects (Aka – Make With Data)
Cassie Xu


The Make with Data project, a collaboration between Teachers College and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, aims to address the lack of diversity in STEM fields by engaging high school aged learners in an informal setting that uses data and data science to identify a compelling local community challenge and to design and implement a solution. Using service learning and constructionism frameworks, we are studying how framing STEM practices as being a way of contributing to and improving one’s community might increase interest in STEM fields. However, rather than create a one-size-fits-all activity that assumes a community problem, the Make with Data project aims to develop and study design frameworks for creating personally meaningful and learner-centric experiences and activities that can be deployed in a broad range of communities with similar demographics. By engaging students throughout New York City (NYC) in data science practices with data experts to identify local challenges, we expect students might develop strong personal connections to problems they identify and the solutions they create, which will in turn positively impact their STEM interests.

What Happens When Student Passion, Interests, and Activism Collide?
Lahari Goud, Matsuo Marti


Civitas Education Partners (CEP) is reimagining schools. An overarching consensus of the Stanford University’s 2017 Policy Forum on K-12 Education was the need to transform the status quo in education. Mark Duggan shared if we keep at the same rate of improvement [of narrowing the achievement gap], it would take anywhere from 60 to 100 years for some of those gaps to close for student populations who are poor, Latino or Black.

CEP aspires to be a world leader in incubating innovative educational solutions that disrupt the status quo, resulting in the elimination of educational inequity through widespread implementation of transformational practices. For the 2018-2019 school year, CEP piloted an innovative, startup learning experience for high school seniors at CICS ChicagoQuest, a small high school serving students that are 90% Black, 7% Hispanic, and 90% economically disadvantaged. 

The Civitas Community Impact Experience (CCIE) empowers students to discover their unique talents, passion and duty to serve through experiences in authentic community projects, problems, and opportunities. The transformational experience engages, challenges, and prepares students to impact their communities and the world as consultants, designers, problem-solvers, critical-thinkers, and innovators. Teams of ChicagoQuest seniors use the City of Chicago as their classroom and engage in projects based on authentic problems and topics from sponsors and community partners that reflect the diversity of the workplace: corporations, entrepreneurial ventures, non-profit organizations, and government agencies.

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin Stokes

Benjamin Stokes

Assistant Prof., American University
Benjamin Stokes is a civic media scholar and designer at American University in the School of Communication and Game Lab. His designs for cities have introduced neighbors, retold local history, and rebuilt payphones. Previously, Benjamin co-founded Games for Change, the movement hub... Read More →
LG

Lahari Goud

Chief Strategy Officer/Co-founder of CCIE, Civitas Education Partners
avatar for Cassie Xu

Cassie Xu

Columbia University
ER

Erin Riesland

PhD Student / Researcher, University of Washington
avatar for Don LaBonte

Don LaBonte

Graduate Researcher, University of Washington
MM

Matsuo Marti

Civitas Education Partners


Friday October 4, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Doheny Beach A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

Game Data Analysis to Understand Players, Design and Learning
This session intends to provide CLS attendees with a survey of how researchers and designers are working at the intersection of video games, educational data mining, and notions of connected learning. In the first part of the symposium, participants will hear from several projects that are using data generated from game play to describe and understand their players and how the the resulting analysis provides new insights for game design and new ways to describe learning and knowing enacted within games. The session will conclude with a demonstration of of an educational data mining process using using live data from national audiences playing a middle school science game in schools. The panelists and audience will discuss and critique each step of the process, from the validity of the events being recorded to the player models that are constructed from the data.

Speakers
SS

Stefan Slater

New York, NY, United States, University of Pennsylvania
avatar for Vishesh Kumar

Vishesh Kumar

Doctoral Candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Elizabeth Owen

Elizabeth Owen

Learning Data Scientist, Learning Data Discovery
Elizabeth Owen holds a PhD in Digital Media (School of Education) from UW-Madison, focused on game-based learning analytics. Currently the Director of Learning and Data Science at Age of Learning, she's committed to optimizing adaptive learning systems through applied machine learning... Read More →
avatar for Erik Harpstead

Erik Harpstead

Pittsburgh, PA, USA, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for David Gagnon

David Gagnon

University of Wisconsin
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Digital Program Manager - Ready To Learn, Twin Cities Public Television
Dennis Ramirez is the Digital Program Manager at Twin Cities Public Television, and an award winning educational game designer. Dennis is interested in how new technologies are used in, and out, of the classroom to support learning. His main area of research focuses on how failure... Read More →


Friday October 4, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay D/E 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

What’s Art Got to Do With It?: Arts Integration Models as a Foundation for Connected Learning
The Connected Learning scholarly community has looked through a variety of lenses to understand how people learn in networks. There is much more to understand about how networks develop, how to sustain them, and further, how we can leverage these networks for teaching and learning. Modes of arts integration offer a useful scaffold for expanding networks of social capital for teaching and learning (Yoon and Baker-Doyle; 2018). In this symposium, authors will present four separate case studies which showcase different ways to capitalize on existing resources for arts integration, and thereby awaken learners to the rich network of resources, institutions, and tools for creative learning. In addition to showcasing a range of modes for networked teaching and learning through the arts, these case studies show work taking place in a variety of settings, including an informal, community-based youth program for video production, a partnership between formal teachers and teaching artists, and a teacher professional development community that takes place in a children’s museum makerspace. Together, these case studies tell the story of how arts-integration represents an important foundation and source of expertise for the development of networks for creative learning.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Jordan-Douglass

Anna Jordan-Douglass

Chief Creative Officer, Makefully
avatar for Jessie Nixon

Jessie Nixon

Doctoral Student, UW-Madison
avatar for Nathan T. Wheeler

Nathan T. Wheeler

PhD Dissertator, UW-Madison School of Education (C&I)
avatar for Emily Schindler

Emily Schindler

Doctoral Candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Friday October 4, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Doheny Beach C/D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

"Losing Is Fun": An Exploration of Player Motivation in Dwarf Fortress
This session will explore the various factors motivating players of Dwarf Fortress, a self-consciously unapproachable, unforgiving, and unwinnable game that has nevertheless managed to attract a dedicated fanbase whose motto is “Losing is fun.” The game, centered around ordering a group of dwarves to build a settlement to ensure their own survival, features an inscrutable ASCII art design, abstruse user interface, no tutorial, and the inability to restart from a prior saved game upon being defeated. In spite of all of this, Dwarf Fortress has developed a cult following since its release in 2006. We will consider why that is, and in particular the motivational impetus of learning from one’s mistakes, the appeal of existing within a procedurally generated world and contributing to its intricate history, and the nearly unprecedented freedom afforded players by the game’s fully open-ended sandbox format.

Speakers
avatar for Erica Holan Lucci

Erica Holan Lucci

Instructional Design Specialist & Part-Time Lecturer, Rutgers University
#edtech, #highered, #gbl, #gamification, #videogames, #learning, #design, #pedagogy, #momming, #scrapbooking, #crafts, #halloween, #jackskellington, #harrypotter, #travel, #research, #anything!
JL

Joseph Lucci

High School Latin Teacher, Ridgewood High School


Friday October 4, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

Shima: A Virtual Reality Measure of Risk Taking
Because of their immersive and motivating nature, video games have emerged as a new way of measuring psychological traits, such as risk-taking. Virtual reality (VR), in particular, affords the salience that traditional measures lack. In this presentation, we showcase Shima, a VR game that combines free exploration with decisions along the way, and players’ gameplay experiences that help finetune our design for later iterations of the game. Specifically, the players enter with the storyline that they are photographers with the explicit goal of documenting creatures on an island. Equipped with only a virtual camera and some film, players try to take the best pictures they can without being attacked. With limited film but little time pressure, players can carefully strategize how to approach each monster to maximize their points. Observational and interview data confirm the salience of the VR landscape but also suggest superfluous design features that could be removed.

Speakers
ES

Emily Sumner

UC Irvine
AS

Angelica Sheen

Research Assistant, UCI, School of Eduucation


Friday October 4, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:00pm

Playful Projections and Programming
In this workshop, participants will explore playful and immersive digital projections and use Scratch code to craft an interactive story or narrative. Participants will actively bridge physical and digital worlds by using projectors, webcams and Scratch to program playful interactions, using common tools and technologies available in many learning environments. With these tools, participants interact directly with the projected animations through their bodies and other materials, and will collaborate to create transformative, full-body immersive environments. The workshop will provide participants with a context in which they can reflect on how a playful attitude can drive exploration, curiosity, and learning in the physical and digital world. At the end of this session, we will facilitate a conversation about how this experience fits into everyone’s unique learning contexts and discuss different approaches to the use of digital and analog technologies and their possible hybridization.

This workshop is hosted by a collective of educators and researchers from diverse learning environments who have a common curiosity for immersive, mixed-reality experiences. We are educators from the Exploratorium, the Scratch Team at MIT, Reggio Children Foundation in Reggio Emilia, and Future University Hakodate in Japan.

Speakers
ES

Eric Schilling

Scratch Community Manager, Scratch / MIT Media Lab
avatar for Kristin Osiecki

Kristin Osiecki

Learning Designer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab
Learning Designer on the Scratch team in the MIT Media Lab's Lifelong Kindergarten Group. Currently creating educational experiences which engage learners in creative programming activities with Scratch.
RM

Ryoko Matsumoto

Museum Educator, The Exploraotrium
avatar for Deanna Gelosi

Deanna Gelosi

Museum Educator and Activity Developer, Exploratorium
Activity developer and facilitator with the Tinkering Studio. Designs learning experiences at the intersection of art, science and technology. Currently researching MS/PhD or PhD programs for Fall 2020 admission in media arts and sciences, digital fabrication, learning sciences, computational... Read More →
LG

Lily Gabaree

MIT Media Lab
SC

Simona Cavalieri

Atelierista, Fondazione Reggio Children - Centro Loris Malaguzzi
FS

Federica Selleri

Atelierista - Maker Facilitator, Fondazione Reggio Children - Centro Loris Malaguzzi


Friday October 4, 2019 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Emerald Bay C 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:00pm

PM Coffee and Tea
Friday October 4, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Pacific D Ballroom Patio

3:30pm

Critical Roleplay: Transforming Dominant Narratives Through Dungeons and Dragons
While digital media such as videogames are often the focus of many conversations about the changing nature of life, learning, and play in today’s society, both the popular press and academic scholarship alike have highlighted the established and still-growing influence of analog role-playing games (RPGs) like Dungeons and Dragons, or D&D (Ewalt, 2014; Jahromi, 2017). The purpose of this well-played session is to invite participants to experience a more critically-conscious approach to tabletop roleplay that aims to resist, subvert, and ultimately transform dominant narratives to create more inclusive and meaningful experiences for diverse groups of players (Flanagan, 2009; Freire, 1970). While many praise D&D and similar role-playing game systems as powerful possibility spaces for encouraging creativity, fostering camaraderie, and promoting deep learning, a growing body of scholarship has begun to identify issues of privilege, power, and oppression that are perpetuated by the design features of such game systems, supporting materials, and even player communities (Garcia, 2017; Trammel, 2014; 2016). In particular, we draw on theories of social identity, positionality, and cultural production to frame our own experiences developing and playing through an East Asian-themed D&D campaign, in which we actively sought to resist stereotypical, Orientalist, & colonizing perspectives (Gygax, 1985). Drawing on our own funds of knowledge and cultural assets, we seek to engage participants in critical conversations about issues of identity, culture, and power within D&D, and explore avenues for creating more representative, responsive, and sustaining experiences for an increasingly diverse population of players.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly M Tran

Kelly M Tran

Assistant Professor, High Point University
PhD Student at Arizona State University.
JH

Jeffrey Holmes

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
EA

Earl Aguilera

Assistant Professor, California State University, Fresno


Friday October 4, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Pacific Ballroom A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Mobilizing Data in Game-Based Learning
Who Played the Game Correctly? Data Signatures of Interaction in Playful Assessment                 Anthony J. Pellicone, Nathan R Holbert, Betsy DiSalvo, Matthew Berland, Vishesh Kumar, Yilang Zhao

In this paper we examine a formative playful assessment called Beats Empire, where learners use data analysis skills to take on the role of a music studio manager. We look at log data of players from classroom implementation of the game, finding three signatures: low activity, high activity with low data usage, and data-informed gameplay. Drawing from field notes and play-aloud interviews, we contextualize these data signatures in player conceptions of the game. We find that our data-informed player employed a number of contexts in interacting with the game, such as domain knowledge, game strategies, and perceptions of popular music. Furthermore, we find that money earned within the game, and achieving a win state (while both intuitively good metrics for assessment) are not as informative as gameplay signatures. We conclude by emphasizing that all three approaches to play are valid, and that each represents its own design challenge in terms of tuning the gameplay as well as creating supporting material to help players provide formative assessment to various types of players.

Election Lab: A Computer-Boardgame Hybrid Where STEM Meets Civics                                             Stuart Criley, Jasminka Criley
Election Lab combines math and civics in a game-based learning platform for middle- and high-school students. It opens the eyes of learners to the hidden but strategic role of STEM professionals in increasingly data-driven presidential campaigns. The games present learners with one of several actual election scenarios from recent history--from landslides to very tight races. The game design is a hybrid of a board game and computer, leveraging advantages of both formats.
The physical board game:
(1) uses large, high-resolution electoral maps and manipulatives;
(2) provides a hands-on experience;
(3) uses an intuitive and accessible format for planning and executing campaigns;
(4) increases accessibility for English language learners and others who may not benefit from traditional presentations of math concepts.
The accompanying computer:
(1) speeds up play with an interactive display that updates after each state battle;
(2) automatically calculates the Electoral Vote totals for each candidate;
(3) and most importantly, captures gameplay data for later statistical analysis and discussion.
The result is a novel informal learning program that uses math to understand strategies used in elections, and uses data generated from gameplay to allow learners to think like statisticians. Elections come alive when they are played, driving history learning. Finally, experiencing an election from the point of view of a campaign strategist and understanding the convoluted mechanics of the Electoral College first-hand will engage future voters, especially for populations that have historically low voter participation.

Rationale for Game-Based Learning in Engineering Education: The Case for Self-Determination Theory
Casper Harteveld, Victoria Bennett, Tarek Abdoun
In recent decades game-based learning has been explored to change education. While individual successes have been noted and various large-scale efforts initiated, structural changes remain difficult. In this paper, we argue that such systemic change can be pursued through using Self-Determination Theory (SDT) from a student and instructor perspective. We make this case in the context of engineering education and illustrate our arguments based on our experiences of implementing a civil engineering game called GeoExplorer across several institutes of higher education. The insights from this paper serve to think about how we can bring systemic changes through game-based learning in engineering education.


Speakers
avatar for Betsy DiSalvo

Betsy DiSalvo

Associate Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology
Dr. Betsy DiSalvo is an Associate Professor in the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Institute of Technology. At Georgia Tech she leads the Culture and Technology (CAT) Lab, where they study cultural values and how those values impact technology use, learning, and production... Read More →
avatar for Casper Harteveld

Casper Harteveld

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
Dr. Casper Harteveld is an Assistant Professor of Game Design at Northeastern University, and author of Triadic Game Design (Springer, 2011), a book about serious game design. He earned his PhD degree from Delft University of Technology in Systems Engineering, Policy Analysis & Management... Read More →
avatar for Anthony J. Pellicone

Anthony J. Pellicone

Post-Doctoral Researcher, University of Maryland - College Park
avatar for Vishesh Kumar

Vishesh Kumar

Doctoral Candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Jasminka Criley, MD

Jasminka Criley, MD

CEO, Indelible Learning, Inc.
Health, Science, K-60 Education, Career-Education, Hands-on learning, PBL, GBL, 21st century learning, Medicine, Medical Pathways, Mentoring
avatar for Stuart Criley

Stuart Criley

Chief Operating Officer, Indelible Learning, Inc.
We place learners in the shoes of professionals, with real-world scenarios, using actual historical data, and consequential decisions to make. Election Lab is a chance to play campaign strategist: with only weeks left in the presidential campaign, in which swing states should you... Read More →


Friday October 4, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Doheny Beach B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Engaging Networked Learners in Higher Ed
Charge on! Fostering First Year Persistence Through Digital Tools
Zoe Corwin


University of Southern California’s Pullias Center for Higher Education and the Get Schooled Foundation partnered with California State University – Dominguez Hills (CSUDH) to address the tenacious challenges of bolstering college student retention and success through the Charge On! Campaign geared towards first-time freshmen in the 2018-2019 academic school year. Our approach educates students about campus resources and skills conducive to college success and is designed to be engaging, meaningful, scalable, and cost-effective through a digital ecosystem, including tailored content on a digital platform, a 1:1 textline connecting students with guidance experts, and gamification strategies to increase understanding around key areas and incentivize engagement. Presenters will highlight the campaign, the impact on persistence outcomes, lessons learned, and potential for scale-up to other CSUs and other post-secondary institutions across the United States.

Practera: An Online Platform to Support and Scaffold Experiential Learning
Andrea Humez, Nikki James


Experiential learning projects with real-world connections, embedded into the curriculum, help students recognize the relevance and applicability of their classroom learning to the STEM workplace, build awareness of the range of STEM career options available, develop the professional skills employers value, and expand their professional networks. At Northeastern University’s College of Professional Studies, these virtual internships give students the opportunity to work on short-term, real-world projects to complement their academic work. Students are matched with sponsors from industry, who play the role of the client, supplying the project, setting expectations for deliverables, and reviewing the final product. The cloud-based Practera platform structures and supports such experiential learning programs, to help everyone involved get the most out of the experience and promote student learning outcomes, sponsor retention, and educator best practices. Practera supports collaboration among students, sponsors and faculty through features such as sponsor feedback loops, team chat, peer review of professional skills and ‘pulse checks’ designed to un-earth potential collaboration issues. Educators are provided with real-time learning analytics that highlight how the student/sponsor collaboration is going, where support or coaching may be required, and recommended interventions to help resolve identified issues. This presentation will share how Northeastern University is using Practera to tailor the scaffolding of experiential learning based on the readiness and academic level of the students, as well as the needs and preferences of educators.

Connecting Learners: Testing an Integrated Approach to Building Community Engagement
Andrea K Flores, Dalia Abbas

In this presentation, we will discuss a test design for an integrated approach to building community in an online, personalized, foundational course being piloted this summer for students at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. First, we will discuss how we used learner journeys to visualize the learner ecosystem and identify hidden opportunities for community building that went beyond the boundaries of the LMS. Then, we will explain how we used these insights to arrive at our test design, and explain the rationale for each facet of our approach. Finally, we will discuss any preliminary data we are able to gather from the pilot this summer as well as any questions and challenges that we encountered. Our aim is to leverage the Connected Learning Community for feedback and recommendations to inform and iterate on the design for the next run of the course.

Networked Narratives: Digital Alchemy, Take 3!
Mia Zamora


Seeking to transform what is possible in the real world via a fictional community and exercising collective civic imagination, Networked Narratives or #NetNarr is a three year experiment in “digital alchemy” (http://netnarr.arganee.world).

In Spring 2017, 2018, & 2019, Mia Zamora and Alan Levine have conducted an open online connected course that has been co-located at both Kean University in New Jersey and the University of Bergen in Norway. Although the course has always included traditional university students, it also has a following of “open participants” who do not share the same institutional affiliations. 

#NetNarr-ians have considered the darkness off the open web (i.e. exploring questions regarding the effect of data tracking, algorithims, AI and machine learning, the attention economy and filter bubbles) and they have also sought the light (participants have inhabited personas, remixed digital media, and explored the role of multiple identities in networked spaces). #NetNarr has included “virtual field trips” - live video visits with international artists & scholars to explore the latest in digital storytelling, electronic literature, digital poetry, fan fiction. In addition, the #NetNarr community has explored cryptography, bot making, interactive fiction, #netprov and collaborative web annotation with hypothes.is.

This showcase will account for the development of #NetNarr as an open stortytelling community, as we consider the intersection of co-learning, networks, civic imagination, pedagogy, and digital writing/making. What was successful, what has failed? It will feature new selections of digital artifacts and networked writing as well as key “take-aways” from the experiment.

Speakers
avatar for Mia Zamora

Mia Zamora

Associate Professor of English, Kean University
Writer. Educator. Connector. Maker.Associate Professor of English, Director of MA in Writing Studies & Kean University Writing Project; DML blogger.
ZC

Zoe Corwin

Research Associate Professor, University of Southern California
avatar for Andrea K Flores

Andrea K Flores

Senior Learning Designer, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Andrea is a senior learning designer at the Teaching and Learning Lab. She has been in the education space for 13 years in various capacities, and is interested in learning experience design, adult learning and development, cross-cultural learning design, and the use of emerging technologies... Read More →
avatar for Dalia Abbas

Dalia Abbas

Instructional Designer, Zendesk
Dalia Abbas is an experienced educator with an interest in instructional design, adult and online learning. Dalia most recently completed a master's in education from Harvard University, specializing in technology, innovation and education. She currently works as an instructional... Read More →
AH

Andrea Humez

Research Associate, Northeastern University


Friday October 4, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Doheny Beach A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Designing Connected Learning: From Research to Resource
The evolution of connected learning has been powered in part, by a partnership between design, research and practice. Efforts to identify, build, support, and study connected learning environments have been fueled by teams of designers, educators, youth, and researchers working together in a spirit of experimentation and iteration. In moving from research to practice, what kinds of guiding theories of design are needed? What kinds of tools and supports are required? Helping youth equitably access and navigate connected learning requires attending to the features and affordances of the learning environments in which they engage. Removing obstacles and barriers, enabling connections to peers and caring adults, creating connections across settings and enabling future learning opportunities are all part of this work. In this session we will profile three resources developed by veteran members of the connected learning community, created to help guide the design of connected learning environments, programs, and platforms. The resources include: an updated new Connected Learning Design Framework that draws on over a decade of research by the Connected Learning Research Network; the Connected Learning Guide, a quick reference providing in-school and out-of-school practitioners with guidelines and examples for how to design, implement, and reflect on the connected learning experiences they create; and the Brokering Youth Pathways toolkit, created to share tools and techniques around the youth development practice of “brokering” or connecting youth to future learning opportunities and resources. The session will introduce and allow participants to engage more deeply with each resource.

Speakers
KL

Kiley Larson

Principal Researcher, Kansas City Social Innovation Center
avatar for Rafi Santo

Rafi Santo

CSforALL, Telos Learning
avatar for Sam Dyson

Sam Dyson

Consultant and Cofounder, Chicago Learning Exchange
I like to design and facilitate learning experiences that help people put their vision into action. Let's connect!
KS

Katie Salen

University of California, Irvine


Friday October 4, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay D/E 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Fair Play: Designing Accessible Games and Digital Experiences
Contemporary educational media producers aim to create equitable products that are accessible to audiences with disabilities. Using academic frameworks, such as Universal Design for Learning (Center for Applied Special Technology, 2012) and other research based best practices as well as practical examples from industry, producers are broadening product and program design, production, and outreach/distribution. Producers from PBS Kids, Schell Games, and Twin Cities PBS will share their teams’ processes and perspectives for making media projects more accessible to children and adults with disabilities. They will share examples from their work as well as successes and challenges for enhancing experiences for all audiences. Learn effective, practical, and innovative approaches for expanding audiences with equitable tech-centered engagement.

Speakers
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Digital Program Manager - Ready To Learn, Twin Cities Public Television
Dennis Ramirez is the Digital Program Manager at Twin Cities Public Television, and an award winning educational game designer. Dennis is interested in how new technologies are used in, and out, of the classroom to support learning. His main area of research focuses on how failure... Read More →
avatar for Harley Baldwin

Harley Baldwin

Vice President of Design, Schell Games
Educaiton and Entertainment Game Design, VR / AR games, Design Department management.
avatar for David Lowenstein

David Lowenstein

Senior Director, Ready To Learn, PBS KIDS Digital
David Lowenstein oversees strategy and operations for the Ready To Learn (RTL) Initiative at PBS. He manages PBS’ RTL partnership with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the U.S. Department of Education, and helps lead teams responsible for content research and development... Read More →


Friday October 4, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Reclaiming Your Space in STEM: Supporting Non-Dominant Youth Through Creative Expression With Representation and Cultural Resonance
The ability for youth to see themselves as creators and inventors translates into seeing themselves as engineers, computer scientists, chemists, physicists, mathematicians, and so on. Learning how to use technology as a tool can change the course of their lives, and the lives of their families, by giving them access to a healthy lifestyle that includes wealth, stable housing, the ability to afford proper healthcare, and a lessened exposure to violence. Allowing non-dominant youth to discover what they are capable of creating is giving them the power to change their lives.
“You can’t be what you can’t see.” For youth to bring the fullness of who they are and creatively can be, cultural resonance can be influential. Having their values, experiences, and interests represented can play a role in increasing confidence, as well as create a space of belonging and inclusivity. This can redefine the identity of a career in STEM and defy any hindering stereotypes associated with the field.
In this symposium we'll discuss and share experiences about encouraging non-dominant youth to bring their full selves into STEM, while giving them examples of what's possible.

Speakers
JT

Jaleesa Trapp

Massachusetts Insitute of Technology
BJ

Britney Johnson

Graduate Research Assistant, MIT Media Lab
LB

Linnea Bostrom

Industrial Design Engineering and Art High School


Friday October 4, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Doheny Beach C/D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

3:30pm

Mapping Personalized Learning Practices in Schools
This workshop invites participants to complete and collectively analyze a survey that maps personalized learning practices. In this workshop style session, participants will take the Mapping Personalized Learning survey, use their individual survey results to reflect on their own personalized learning practices, and discuss with peers strategies for strengthening practice. Formative feedback based on the survey will be used to discuss and plan for growth and the sustainability of personalized teaching practices. Participants will also contribute to the iterative design process of the survey itself. https://goo.gl/irVNQ5

Speakers
avatar for Gerald Dryer

Gerald Dryer

Director of Research, Personalization in Practice - UW Madison
Gerald Dryer Is the Research Director for the Personalization in Practice research group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research explores the relation between social justice and personalized learning in schools. His 24 year career as an educator includes classroom practice... Read More →



Friday October 4, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

A Comparison of Goal-Directed Interactions in Improv Performance and Collaborative Problem-Solving
Improv performance and collaborative problem-solving (CPS) are both dependent on successful collaboration, but the goals are different, yet interactions between individuals and contexts are similar. By using conversation analysis techniques, we strived to highlight similarities between improv performance and CPS by examining the co-occurence of improv rules, shared mental models, and CPS. This study compared interactions within 1 adult improv performance rehearsal, 3 adult improv form-creation workshops, and 2 eighth-grade computer programming classes. Each group consisted of three individuals of mixed expertise (i.e., one advanced, one intermediate, one novice) and roles assigned to each participant. Despite differences in contexts and individuals, there were similar co-occurrences of consensus-building, goal-orientation, and accepting and refining of ideas.

Speakers
avatar for Joey Huang

Joey Huang

Indiana University Bloomington
I am a doctoral student in Indiana University’s Learning Sciences program. My research interests include affinity spaces, informal learning, and learning through social media. In particular, I am interested in developing creative and innovative learning environments. I recently... Read More →
AP

Anthony Phonethibsavads

Indiana University


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

At Work and in Games: Case Study of Sandbox Video Game Behavior Reflecting Work Behavior
In this case study, the author examines closely at how a participant views transfer between one’s job and gameplay in practice. The thought process and problem-solving dispositions of Code Wizard, a lead mobile software developer in his 20’s, is unraveled over an hour of Minecraft (MC) gameplay where he builds an Iowa-themed rollercoaster. The author argues that the participant displays the same behavioral pattern in-game as expected in his full-time job. The argument is not for a causal relationship, but to claim that there can be a reflective relationship between playing sandbox games and one’s career responsibilities.

Speakers
SY

Sherry Yi

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Blocks With Friends: Collaborative Programming With Minecraft
Abstract: We will report on a comparative study of collaboration in the virtual sandbox game Minecraft. A group of five middle school students participated in six hours of Minecraft education edition game play under two conditions: 1) regular creative mode and 2) creative mode with the MakeCode programming interface. Discourse analysis will be used to compare group utterances under the two conditions. Moreover, interaction analysis will be used to closely examine how moments of game play with programming may reveal disparate patterns of collaboration than regular game play.

Speakers
avatar for David Bar-El

David Bar-El

PhD Candidate, Northwestern University


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Broadening Computer Science, Coding and Making in Schools Through Connected Learning After Teacher Education Programs
The working group Didactics of Informatics at the University Osnabrück is testing and evaluating in two pilot projects the broadening of CS and Maker education in schools through teacher trainings under aspects of the Connected Learning Framework.

Speakers
avatar for Mirek Hancl

Mirek Hancl

Universität Osnabrück


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

CellEnergy: Cell Biology Can Be Fun
CellEnergy is an iOS educational app we developed to teach the basics of photosynthesis and cellular respiration for high school life science courses. Through our many exploratory interviews with biology teachers, photosynthesis was identified as a particularly difficult subject area to engage students with, both because of its abstract nature and the invisible cellular processes it involves. As such we felt it was an ideal topic to address through an interactive learning app. CellEnergy exemplifies a hybrid approach to learning apps, in which the focus is primarily on learning outcomes with game-like elements incorporated to make complex processes visible in an engaging and a playful way. The activities in CellEnergy are based on multiple evidence-based learning practices, such as retrieval practice, spaced learning, and immediate feedback. Virtual labs provide inquiry-based learning and reinforcement of science practices in the context of photosynthesis. The sequence of activities centers around a narrative in which users grow and harvest plants in order to create a common snack, like chips and salsa, highlighting the relevance of photosynthesis in students’ everyday lives. Students use points earned to purchase supplies and decorative features for their “outdoor kitchen”, which provides a motivational incentive for completing activities and adds a layer of game-like engagement. Our project culminated in a cluster randomized controlled trial that included over 600 students in 22 high school biology classrooms. We demonstrated that using CellEnergy resulted in significantly greater learning gains in both photosynthesis concept knowledge and science practices knowledge compared to standard instruction.

Speakers
avatar for Adam Gordon

Adam Gordon

President, Andamio Games
I'm President of Andamio Games, a subsidiary of Adventium Labs. We're focused on using mobile apps to teach difficult-to-learn subjects in education and small business. I have a background in ed-tech, marketing, start-ups, teaching and ballroom dance.
avatar for Katrina Schleisman

Katrina Schleisman

Applied Learning Scientist, Andamio Games
I'm an applied learning scientist and designer at Andamio Games in Minneapolis, MN. I love to talk about how learning and memory research can be applied to the design of learning games. Our company creates STEM learning games using evidence-based learning principles. We partner with... Read More →


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Designing Healthier Youth-Led Online Communities: Towards a Conceptual Framework
Online multiplayer social games, like Minecraft, lend themselves as viable sites for youth to learn and practice social and emotional skills. Players can interact socially during gameplay, creating, collaborating, competing, and communicating. They also encounter conflict, both that engineered by the game and that created by players through disruptive behavior or social drama. Socio-technical mechanisms, like whitelisting servers or online moderation are widely accepted as potential remedies that limit and/or eliminate player-led conflict and curb toxic social behavior. However, such mechanisms may also reduce learning opportunities for youth to grow and develop both social and problem solving skills. A recent study offers fresh perspectives on ways current online gaming moderation practices disempower youth communities (Slovak et al., 2018). In this paper, we build on this research to develop a conceptual framework supporting the design of play-based online learning environments that embrace conflict and empower youth. Through the careful integration of social emotional learning strategies that originate in evidence-based prevention science programs, we discuss an online afterschool program for youth ages 8-13 in Minecraft. We report select findings from a six-month pilot of the program wherein we observed youth practicing and/or developing social competence, overcoming conflict, and creating a community guided by norms they themselves developed and enforced.

Speakers
KS

Katie Salen

University of California, Irvine
avatar for Krithika Jagannath

Krithika Jagannath

PhD Candidate Informatics, UC Irvine
I am a 4th year PhD candidate in the Informatics department at UCI and I work with Prof. Katie Salen (Made With Play Lab). My approach involves conducting foundational and design-led research to study socio-technical phenomena in youth. I am interested in designing technologies that... Read More →


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Developing Makerspaces in Libraries Throughout California
Developing Makerspaces in Libraries throughout California is a pilot project from the California State Library in collaboration with the Bay Area Discovery Museum (Phase 1 and Phase 2), and Regallium Consulting LLC (Phase 3). The project is establishing unique community-driven makerspaces in ten public libraries in California. Participating libraries are geographically spread out across the state, and were selected by prioritizing libraries that were under-resourced as defined by budget, staffing, or serving a high needs community. An essential component for the sustainability for these library maker programs is to develop strategic collaborative partnerships, where the library can engage with the local maker ecosystem including education institutions, industry, civic groups and government.

In Phase 1 and 2 of the project, libraries conducted needs assessments, participated in training for maker education, launched prototypes and made a plan for their makerspaces, which range from a dedicated space, a mobile space or a pop up program. Each space includes a physical environment for making, local partnerships and creative programming.

Phase 3, from September 2019 to July 2020 the makerspaces will launch and the planning tools and resources from the pilot will be refined, tested, and published in a toolkit. that will include customizable resources to help future libraries build budgets, an action plan, a data collection plan, a logic model, an elevator pitch, a program inventory and marketing plan to make mindful, data-driven and intentional decisions when setting up their makerspace.

Speakers
PV

Pamela Van Halsema

Library Makerspace Project Lead, Bay Area Discovery Museum


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Digital Tools for Social Engagement Around Reading: A Case Study of Bookopolis
Reading is a fundamental skill that is critical for academic success. Beyond basic development, building expertise as a reader requires prolonged engagement, in which reading is used both for pleasure and as a resource for learning (Guthrie and Wigfield, 2014). According to previous literature, interest-driven learning and social motivation can foster this sustained reading engagement (Fink, 1995; Guthrie and Wigfield, 2014). The present research aims to study classrooms that use a unique digital tool for reading, Bookopolis, which affords both interest-driven book exploration and peer-based reading recommendations. Using a mixed methods approach, this study will examine how 3rd-5th students and teachers use Bookopolis, specifically what drives peer-based reading recommendations and how this influences reading behavior. Social network analysis will be used to investigate what drives patterns of recommendation uptake amongst students, as well as whether these patterns predict changes in the diversity of genres and amount of books that students read. This method will be complemented by qualitative interviews with students and teachers to inform an in-depth understanding of Bookopolis usage in the classroom. The results of this study will contribute insights on how digital tools such as Bookopolis might be used in third grade classrooms to sustain socially motivated and interest-driven reading engagement in young readers.

Speakers
avatar for Cindy Kim-Ngan Lam

Cindy Kim-Ngan Lam

PhD Candidate, Stanford University


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Does 'Where' Matter?
I will present the ongoing work with the introductory chapter of my compilation thesis, in which four studies are addressing: different kinds of participation, participatory identities, characteristics of learning in digital gaming communities and digital play as the ‘where’ for children´s learning. The thesis will therefore add to the educational research field taking its interest in connecting children´s out-of-school learning experiences to their learning in school, by recognising and building upon children’s familiarity with digital cultures and digital literacies. The overarching research question of the thesis is: What aspects, from children´s participation in digital play communities, appear to be of significance for connecting children´s out-of-school learning experiences to their learning in school? The theoretical framing departs from Dewey´s notion of experience, Lave and Wenger´s theory about communities of practice, and their notion of legitimate peripheral participation. Additionally, Wenger´s conceptual framework provided an analytical tool with useful components (meaning, identity, practice and community) for understanding and discussing children´s experiences from learning in practice. By studying children´s (8-13 years of age) actions and talk about actions in a variety of ways in different digital play contexts, where the children are coming into presence as subjects, something significant can be said about what they actually are experiencing and learning from participating in digital play. Results from the included studies will be presented, as empirical models and a tentative conceptual framework outlining children´s pathways as participatory subjects.

Speakers
avatar for Marina Wernholm

Marina Wernholm

PhD student, Linnaeus University


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Game Based Learning: The Effect of Word Games and Elaboration on Learning Science Concepts
Word games have been used for many years in a variety of science settings to learn technical vocabulary, and improve scientific thinking. However, there are few controlled, experiments with word games, and even fewer that evaluate the effectiveness in terms of performance. Therefore, we do not have evidence-based best practices for implementing word games, despite the fact that they are prominently used. In this paper we start to bridge this gap and describe an experiment to evaluate the effect of word games and word games + elaboration on learning. Using a within-subject design, 29 students participated in a controlled randomized experiment. Results indicate that a word game + elaboration study session was statistically more effective for learning than a word game alone (effect size .67) or a control condition (effect size 1.7). The word game condition was also more effective than the control condition (effect size of 1.0). These learning effects were measured more than one day after the study task. Ninety percent of students reported enjoying the word game more than their typical study method, and more than 50% thought it was more effective. Implications for these results are broad, suggesting that a 20-minute word game if implemented correctly can have a large effect on scientific learning.

Speakers
SM

Shane Mueller

Associate Professor, Michigan Technological University
WK

Warat Khaewratana

Graduate Student, Michigan Technological University


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

How Three 4-8th Grade Teachers in New Jersey Suburban Schools Are Thinking About and Implementing Making With Students
Makerspaces and related “maker” activities, including tinkering with circuits and microcomputers, creating 3D designs with CAD software, robotics, and game design have begun to make their way into K-12 schools and classrooms. At the same time, teachers are faced with deciding what aspects of making are most beneficial and practical to employ with their students. This presentation discusses how three teachers in suburban New Jersey schools are interpreting and implementing making with 4-8th grade students. Participant interviews and multiple classroom observations provide insight into the thinking and practices of two STEM teachers and a fourth grade social studies teacher. Preliminary findings of this multiple case-study (Yin, 2017) illustrate a range of thinking about making among teachers, from a top-down emphasis on following the iterative cycle of design to a bottom-up emphasis on making meaning through creation. Participants seem to agree on the benefits of peer-to-peer interaction and less-structured “play-like” activities for early adolescents. At the same time, they share concerns about how the norms of a makerspace might sometimes conflict with the norms of a highly-structured school setting. These findings could be useful to policymakers looking for ways to encourage and support the development of makerspaces and making in schools.

Speakers
avatar for Bridget Looney

Bridget Looney

Doctoral Candidate, Montclair State University
I'm really interested in how teachers are incorporating design thinking and computational learning into their PK-12 practice and how they are working with or around traditional school structures to do so.


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Korean Pop Culture Fan’s Language Learning Through Use of Various Technology
The non-Korean heritage language learners at a four-year state university in the Midwest are excited to learn the Korean language and culture. All of them came to learn the language due to their interest in Korean popular culture, and they will come to their very first Korean language class with abundant knowledge in the language and culture due to their active use of various digital technologies such as videos and website from the Internet, social media and mobile applications. Due to the easy accessibility to various resources from the advanced digital technologies, many students are exposed to the language learning opportunities, yet, it is easily assumed that the non-heritage students have lesser language exposure or knowledge in the Korean language than the Korean heritage students. Through interviews with four students from the Korean language classes, we found that these students use various internet websites and mobile applications and watch videos on YouTube to learn the language. Second, some create their online affinity spaces while learning the language on their own and make transnational and international friends. Lastly, they constantly used their social media or instant messaging application to communicate with their classmates and friends and practice the language. These students shared that the Korean language class was a place for them to breathe in their busy college life because it was something that they wanted to learn and that they will always seek for more opportunities to practice and learn the language.

Speakers
HK

Hanae Kim

Ph.D. Student, University of Illinois at Chicago


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Learning to Program While Learning English: Integrating Computer Science in an English as a New Language Course Through Personal Narratives
Just as learning to use a new language is more than memorizing verb conjugations and vocabulary, being computationally literate is more than ordering the keywords of a programming language with the correct syntax. It’s about being an active participant in computational communities -- creating, reading, and using code depending on the context and purpose. For this poster, we describe a co-created unit between a teacher and a researcher which integrates computer science into an English as a New Language classroom, in which the teacher doesn’t speak the home languages of her students. This unit approaches computational literacies by considering how language-learning, and in particular, learning literacies with and through language, may provide clues for supporting students’ participation in computing. Our approach is rooted in the philosophy of literate programming (that code is meant to be understood by machines and people) and a lens from bilingual education called translanguaging (bilinguals selecting varied linguistic, semiotic, and social features from unique language repertoires as they communicate and learn). We view code as a resource people use in constellation with other languaging practices to communicate with and for computers and other humans. Examples from classroom practice include an activity that guided students to narrate personal narratives orally that would transfer from a PowerPoint presentation to interactive projects in Scratch. These activities drew on a range of students’ meaning-making practices, guiding them to put code in their own words and voices to participate in broader conversations.

Speakers
SV

Sara Vogel

PhD Candidate, CUNY Graduate Center
MY

Marcos Ynoa

Research Assistant, CUNY


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Mapping of Computational Thinking Resources in Elementary School: Case Studies of Coding Interest
Increasing diversity in the CS pipeline is a longstanding concern (Margolis, Estrella, Goode, Holme, & Nao, 2010) and part of doing this is creating equitable pathways to CS. The CS for All movement has generated excitement around the country and fostered new strands of research about computer science education and computational thinking. Yet there are still many open questions about computational thinking and coding interest with elementary school aged children. Since learning is distributed across time and space, it often looks different outside of school than what gets evaluated in school (Barron & Bell, 2015; Barron, 2014). Understanding what early computational thinking looks like and where and how students are learning these thinking skills is critical to beginning to develop and test lessons and assessments.
This poster presents case studies of coding interest that explore the resources that children in a low-income school in Silicon Valley have to engage in digital practice and learn the fundamentals of coding. The analysis uses a learning ecology framework (Barron, 2006) to contextualize the students’ learning resources and interests, and map connections between them across time and space. While school appears as an important node for computational thinking resources, students’ interest in coding builds across time and space, and indeed becomes most evident when we look at their time outside of school where students use their time to learn and explore through networked resources including YouTube and online gaming communities.

Speakers
RP

Rose Pozos

Stanford University


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Mission HydroSci: Gameplay to Meet Learning Standards and More
Mission HydroSci (MHS) teaches water systems and scientific argumentation towards meeting Next Generation Science Standards. MHS is a game-based 3D virtual environment for enacting transformational role-playing, wherein students must learn new knowledge and competencies in order to successfully complete the game missions. MHS was developed for middle school science as a replacement unit of about 6 to 8 hours and uses analytics and a teacher dashboard to help teachers support their students.

The MHS game provides an active learning environment for meeting these learning objectives by engaging students in a narrative about needing to investigate water resources and use scientific argumentation to complete missions critical to the survival and accomplishments of the members of their scientific enterprise. Along with the narrative gameplay MHS includes learning progressions for water systems science and scientific argumentation, a visually exciting environment, substantial interaction and feedback, and applies transformational role-playing as an approach to integrate learning within gameplay.

We plan a field test using a randomized control trial (RCT) to rigorously evaluate the impact of MHS game play. The RCT will be undertaken in Winter, 2019. However, to test the feasibility of conducting a large field test in classrooms we undertook a feasibility field test in the Spring of 2018. Our poster will present MHS and the statistical results of the study from pre and post testing along with lessons learned about the implementation

Speakers
avatar for James Laffey

James Laffey

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
JS

Justin Sigoloff

Creative Director, Adroit Studiots, University of Missouri, Columbia
JG

Joseph Griffin

University of Missouri


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Motivating Computational Weaving: Intersections of Goals and Environmental Aspects to Deepen Engagement
Weaving played a crucial role in the history of computer science and has recently been rediscovered as an interest-driven alternative for computer science education. While personal interests and peer engagement can deepen disciplinary learning, we know little about the motivational processes that support youth to engage with computational concepts through weaving. Following a sociocultural approach to motivation, this qualitative research analyzes video data of a middle school weaving. We iteratively coded students’ goals and environmental aspects to understand how they drove student motivation to keep going. We found two dominant processes of motivations for computational weaving: (1) peer engagement supported goal accomplishment, and (2) material choice drove pattern variation. We discuss implications for facilitation of weaving for CS learning.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Keune

Anna Keune

Graduate Research Assistant, Indiana University
I am a doctoral candidate in Learning Sciences at Indiana University working with Dr. Kylie Peppler in the Creativity Labs. As a new media artist and designer, she leverages her international experiences across four continents to engage in research that spans across art, technology... Read More →
KA

Kylie A Peppler

University of California, Irvine
LF

Lillyanna Faimon

Student, Indiana University


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Platforms, Pedagogies, and Privacy: How the Platformization of Education Is Pedagogicizing Home-School Relations
This poster considers the significance of the growth of new digital platforms that link families, home, children and schools, of which the best-known example is perhaps "ClassDojo." These platforms are now in daily use in many schools and educational settings around the world, and although they appear to build on uncontroversial and established forms of communication between teachers and parents, we raise questions here about the ways they not only impose behavioral norms on families and teachers, but how such interaction might redefine family relations with schools. We also raise questions about issues surrounding data privacy, examining how (or if) educators and parents consider whether the digital platforms they use are privacy-protective. We seek to better understand how families and teachers perceive such risks, and whether they act to mitigate them. Our broad concern in this work in progress is to invite further inquiry and spark discussion around how new digital platforms are mediating home-school communication and pedagogicizing families and home life in ways that subvert a variety of everyday learning to school norms and behaviors, and in ways that may afford little data privacy for students and families.

Speakers
DD

Daniela DiGiacomo

Postdoctoral Scholar, UC Riverside
JZ

Jessica Zacher Pandya

Professor, CSU Long Beach College of Education


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Playing and Learning Science as a Family with a PBS KIDS App
Science literacy is essential in today’s  science- and technology-oriented world. To support family science exploration, the CPB-PBS Ready To Learn Initiative developed the PBS KIDS Play & Learn Science app, which provides in-app and hands-on science explorations for children ages 3-6 and their parents. The app introduces science concepts and practices involving weather, solids and liquids, forces and motion, and light and shadow.

This study explored the impact of the PBS KIDS Play & Learn Science app in a supportive context. This study had a single-group design with pre and post parent surveys (n=31) and researcher-developed child assessments (n=33).

Children showed gains in (1) understanding of science content and practices; (2) science vocabulary; and (3) excitement about STEM. Parents reported increased parent-child engagement in science and engineering activities, and increased confidence in supporting science learning. Results demonstrate the potential of educational media to support children’s learning, particularly with adult support.

Speakers
CC

Claire Christensen

Education Researcher, SRI International
avatar for Megan Silander

Megan Silander

Research Scientist, EDC, Center for Children and Technology
NH

Naomi Hupert

Education Development Center


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Restorying Geek Identity: Exploring Collaborative Counter-Storytelling As Youth of Color Reimagine Connections to Computer Science
As computer science (CS) education research seeks to create more inclusive learning environments for minoritized youth, researchers must consider how youth’s intersectional identities impact their CS participation. Not only can stereotypes about computer science negatively affect youth’s sense of belonging or fit in the field (Cheryan, Plaut, Davies, & Steele, 2009), but CS classrooms and technologies can reproduce dominant narratives that alienate youth from various marginalized identities (Ashcraft, Eger, & Scott, 2017). Responding to this issue, the “Restorying Computer Science Identity” project seeks to broaden participation in computing by creating access for groups who have historically and systemically been shut out of CS. While learning computational skills in programming and designing interactive paper quilts, youth of color also draw upon their lived experiences to reimagine new connections and stories about computer science. As a poster, our presentation will detail a month long workshop taking place at a local science museum’s STEM program comprised of high school aged students, most of whom identify as students of color. Using video observations and voice recordings, students’ reflective worksheets and artifacts, and student interviews, we explore the following research questions: 1) What happens when students use computer science skills and digital technologies to restory their CS identities? 2) What kinds of metanarratives about CS and computer scientists do students identify? 3) What does the process of restorying look like? Findings for this project include the implications of integrating computer science and critical literacies with youth counter-storytelling and the development of intersectional CS identities, particularly as it connects to research and pedagogy in computer science education.

Speakers
avatar for Mia Shaw

Mia Shaw

Research Assistant, University of Pennsylvania - GSE
JC

Josh Coleman

University of Pennsylvania


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

STEMports: A Community-Based, Augmented Reality Learning Game
Using participatory design methodologies with two rural regions in Maine, the Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance (MMSA) in collaboration with Field Day Lab (FDL) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison are co-designing a community-based STEM learning game called STEMports. The game is based on FDL’s ARIS and Siftr learning applications and features activities and challenges that take players on localized AR missions to discover emerging STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) careers in their community; specifically highlighting innovations in the fields of sustainable agriculture and aquaculture, forest products, and renewable energy. The project will discuss findings and insights from the first project year highlighting the co-design process with teams of youth and adults that help to design and test the platform including: design principles necessary to facilitate a co-designed AR game for STEM learning; interactive dynamics in the online and offline learning environments related to how participants build social networks in an AR community; and, interactions which are the most impactful for participants’ STEM identity, agency, and career trajectories? The project’s use of community engagement meant to involve local groups, professionals and youth in the co-design of STEMports provides crucial insight into best practices in the field of participatory design research. Year one’s findings will be used to build a fully functional and scalable application that will be promoted in years two and three. The project team will also present a functioning prototype of the STEMports application to experience on our ipads or the conference participant’s own iphone.

Speakers
avatar for David Gagnon

David Gagnon

University of Wisconsin
SB

Scott Byrd

Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance
DM

Daniel MacPhee

STEM Specialist, Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Tracing Students’ Socio-Digital Ecology: Learning Through Socio-Digital Participation Inside and Outside of School
The purpose of the study was to trace Finnish primary school students’ (n=296; grades 5th-7th) socio-digital activities ranging from ordinary to more advanced practices across informal and formal contexts. Many of their teachers were involved in digital innovation activities and therefore enacted sophisticated socio-digital practices in their classrooms. We examined young people’s socio-digital learning ecology, the intensity and complexity of socio-digital participation (SDP) and the digital skills associated with technologies preferred by both girls (n=136) and boys (n=160). By relying on the Genres of Participation, we distinguished students’ friendship-driven and interest-driven practices and identified six informal and three formal dimensions of SDP that constituted their learning ecology. Based on the intensity of dimensions, three socio-digital participation profiles were uncovered: hanging out (n=131), messing around (n=116) and geeking out participators (n=49). Students’ digital skills were conceptualized as academic, artistic and technical socio-digital competences. In average, the students of the present sample participated more frequently in messing around and geeking out activities in school compared to corresponding informal practices, if the recreational gaming is opted out. Regarding the participation profiles, there were no differences between girls and boys while with respect to self-reported socio-digital skills; girls saw themselves as more competent with artistic and boys with technical aspects of digital technologies. The results suggest that innovative teachers can promote a more equal socio-digital participation and build of young people’s 21st century skills through digital-pedagogical practices that are attractive both for girls and boys.

Speakers
avatar for Netta Tiippana

Netta Tiippana

PhD Candidate, Helsinki University, Growing Mind Research Project


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Using Media to Support Early Science Learning
What supports do parents need to foster science learning at home? We set out to answer this question by pairing a nationally representative survey with a qualitative study to investigate parents’ perceptions of their role in children’s learning, particularly science learning and particularly with the use of media. Most parents surveyed reported high levels of confidence in helping their young children with reading, mathematics, and social skills, while just over half of parents reported they felt very confident in their ability to assist their child in learning about science. Parents with less education were less likely than parents with more education to report that they felt very confident in their ability to support their children’s science learning. An implication is that, in order to ensure that parents are comfortable with, and can support their children in using science media,  developers of science media should design ways to boost parent confidence in science. Media can model or encourage everyday ways to engage children in science, provide relatable family science role models, and show that science can be about learning together rather than providing children with correct answers.

Speakers
CC

Claire Christensen

Education Researcher, SRI International
avatar for Megan Silander

Megan Silander

Research Scientist, EDC, Center for Children and Technology
NH

Naomi Hupert

Education Development Center


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Using Virtual Reality to Mitigate Culture Shock in Short-Term Study Abroad
As the diverse range of study abroad options is increasing, universities are offering more short-term study abroad options which range from 1-8 weeks. Students participating in these programs often spend their initial days or weeks in the country working through the effects of adjusting to an unfamiliar environment, in other words, culture shock. This study aims to utilize virtual reality (VR) as a tool to reduce culture shock prior to participants departing for their short-term study abroad trip.

In this conceptual design, students participate in a hands-on and immersive VR experience that enables them to navigate various physical and social environments that are different from their home environment. These virtual simulations include getting from the airport to their hotel via subway, checking into the hotel, purchasing food at the market, engaging in proper work etiquette, and dining in a restaurant. Upon completion of this pre-trip VR experience, it is expected that the effects of culture shock will be mitigated; thus, students will be able to take full advantage of the study abroad experience.

Speakers
BM

Brian McCommons

Drexel University
MW

Monique Woodard

PhD Student, Drexel University
MM

Mikhail Miller

Ph.D Student, Drexel University


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

WeScratch: Creative Coding Online Gatherings
WeScratch are free online gatherings for everyone who wants to learn how to create projects in Scratch, with support, feedback and encouragement from others. This poster describes how the online learning experience is designed, presents a few examples of case studies, some early results, and ideas for future directions.

Speakers
CP

Carmelo Presicce

MIT Media Lab


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

What Maker Assessment Should Look Like: A Closer Look at the Design Process
Although maker-centered learning in schools has grown rapidly in recent years, the existing assessment approaches often do not meet the needs in assessing the multifaceted learning and development that occur within maker processes. This research paper reports on the development of principles for assessment in making & learning and describes assessment tools that we have iteratively designed to envision how maker assessment can move beyond rubrics and portfolios.

Speakers
avatar for Yoon Jeon "YJ" Kim

Yoon Jeon "YJ" Kim

Executive Director, Playful Journey Lab
Dr. YJ Kim is the executive director of the MIT Playful Journey Lab (playful.mit.edu). Her work has centered on the topic of innovative assessment and how technological advancement influences what we are measuring about student learning and how we are measuring it. For more than ten... Read More →
avatar for Justin Reich

Justin Reich

Asst. Professor, MIT
avatar for Stephanie Chang

Stephanie Chang

Director of Impact, Maker Ed
Stephanie Chang is the Director of Impact at Maker Ed, having spent 5 years previously leading and designing Maker Ed’s program and project offerings for educators and institutions around the country. Her current work focuses on evaluating the impact and value of programmatic efforts... Read More →
YM

Yumiko Murai

Postdoctoral Associate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

4:30pm

Who Benefits From Ethnic Capital? Group Norms, Social-Class and Education Among Armenian-Americans in Los Angeles
Sociologists show that the high levels of college-educated adults found in specific immigrant communities in the United States become a social resource, called ethnic capital, which promotes academic achievement for even the working-class descendants of these groups who access it by participating in coethnic community organizations. But how does ethnic capital actually guide youth educational mobility? And does it benefit coethnic families who do not participate in these supplementary organizations? I investigate these questions through original, qualitative fieldwork with 42 working-class, second-generation Armenian-Americans in Los Angeles. By comparing how social support for college preparation varies with organizational participation, I find that despite categorically converging with organizational participants in graduate degree aspirations, non-participants access weaker mobility resources which distances them from perceived ethnic norms of academic achievement and a symbolic belonging to the coethnic community.
That is, although research suggests that second-generation immigrant youth, especially those of working-class parents, should have unproblematic access to ethnic capital because of cultural features in immigrants’ communities, I find there are material barriers which distinguish the social capital gains accessed by organizational participants versus non-participants. Whereas non-participants solely access symbolic resources by way of normative expectations enforced through coethnic networks, organizational participants enjoy sponsoring social capital which facilitates robust mentorship relationships that provide academic purpose by framing educational and professional mobility as a vehicle for contributing to the welfare of the ethnic nation. I conclude that how ethnic capital benefits families varies but favors those who already possess material and cultural resources to enroll their children in coethnic organizations.

Speakers
OK

Oshin Khachikian

PhD Candidate, University of California, Irvine


Friday October 4, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697
 
Saturday, October 5
 

8:30am

AM Coffee and Pastries
Come enjoy some coffee/tea and pastries before the featured event!

Saturday October 5, 2019 8:30am - 9:30am
Crystal Cove Auditorium Foyer

8:30am

Luggage hold
Luggage will also be stored in this space. Check-in desk will be located outside the room.



Saturday October 5, 2019 8:30am - 4:30pm
Crescent B 311 W Peltason Dr, Irvine, CA 92697

8:30am

Quiet Room
Chill out in peace and quiet! No talking, meeting groups, or phone calls in this room please.




Saturday October 5, 2019 8:30am - 4:30pm
Crescent A 311 W Peltason Dr, Irvine, CA 92697

8:35am

All-Day Bus Schedule October 5, 2019
CLS is providing bus transportation to UC Irvine from the Hyatt Regency John Wayne Newport Beach. In order to arrive before the 9:30 AM keynote, please, wait outside the Hyatt at 8:35 AM to secure a spot in one of the two buses departing between 8:35 and 8:40 AM. A CLS staff member will assist you to board the bus. Upon arrival to campus, signage will direct you to the UCI Student Center.

Bus service is provided all day.

Saturday Oct 5 - Hyatt Departure to UCI
8:30 AM - Meet up in front of hotel to board the bus.
9:35 AM
10:15 AM
10:45 AM
11:15 AM
11:45 AM
12:15 PM
12:45 PM
1:15 PM
1:45 PM
2:45 PM
3:45 PM

Saturday Oct 5 - UCI Departure to Hyatt
10:05 AM
10:45 AM
11:15 AM
11:45 AM
12:15 PM
12:45 PM
1:15 PM
2:15 PM
3:15 PM
4:15 PM

Saturday October 5, 2019 8:35am - 4:15pm

9:30am

Keynote with Tracy Fullerton
Walking with Thoreau: Uncommon Wisdom for Game Designers
Designers of games for learning and social impact often talk about the importance of creating game mechanics that are integrated with learning goals and content. We talk about the criticalness of creating mechanics that engage the player and are “fun” in and of themselves. And, we talk about the importance of working in cross-disciplinary teams that bring content experts and evaluators together with experienced game designers to build systems together that represent the best of both learning and playing. All of these are indeed important to the design of compelling and innovative social impact games. But there are other, equally compelling modes of learning and understanding that may complement the systemic, challenge-based activity commonly found in game mechanics. These are modes of reflection and absorption that are often a part of the true synthesis of ideas, and the transfer of ideas into a personal and original connection to material. In this talk, which will draw on her own work, as well as other successful impact games, designer Tracy Fullerton explores the role of uncommon mechanics such as walking, musing, waiting and reflecting on the design of games that go beyond short term learning to become opportunities for long term learning and understanding

Tracy Fullerton is an experimental game designer, professor and director of the USC Games program. Her research center, the Game Innovation Lab, has produced several influential independent games, including Cloud, flOw, Darfur is Dying, The Night Journey, with artist Bill Viola and the recently released Walden, a game, a simulation of Henry David Thoreau’s experiment at Walden Pond which was named “Game of the Year” at Games for Change 2017 and “Developer Choice” at IndieCade 2017. Tracy is the author of “Game Design Workshop: A Playcentric Approach to Creating Innovative Games,” a design textbook used at game programs worldwide, and holder of the Electronic Arts Endowed Chair in Interactive Entertainment. Prior to USC, she designed games for companies including Microsoft, Sony, MTV, among many others. Tracy’s work has received numerous honors including an Emmy nomination for interactive television, Indiecade’s “Sublime Experience,” “Impact,” and “Trailblazer” awards, Games for Change “Game Changer” award, the Game Developers Choice “Ambassador” Award, and Time Magazine’s Best of the Web.

Speakers
TF

Tracy Fullerton

Director at USC Game Innovation Lab, USC Games


Saturday October 5, 2019 9:30am - 10:30am
Crystal Cove Auditorium 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

10:30am

AM Coffee and Tea
Saturday October 5, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Crystal Cove Auditorium Foyer

11:00am

Facilitating and Fostering Computational Creation
It’s About Relationships: Examining Facilitation as a Relational Practice                                          
Ricarose Roque, Kristina Stamatis

In this paper, we focus on the experiences of facilitators in informal settings designed to engage families in creative computing, or making, designing, and tinkering with computing. Facilitators can play important roles in developing welcoming spaces that enable youth to create and to learn computational literacy skills; however, research is still needed to examine the practices that facilitators use to engage with families in these activities. In this study, we highlight the ways that new facilitators came to take on the role of facilitators and focus specifically on the role of relationship building in their development and practices as facilitators. We worked with nine facilitators during five intergenerational computing workshops to examine the practices they used to develop relationships with participants and the ways they interpreted and reflected upon these relationships to deepen their development as facilitators. Our findings indicate that facilitators and families in these workshops built relationships by leveraging common language and learning practices, sharing family stories, and utilizing space to influence interactions. Additionally, as facilitators recognized and reflected on these relationships, they also reported growing in their understanding of facilitation.

Creative Production With Tablet Applications for Learning Digital, Social and Interpersonal Skills in the Primary Level Classroom                                                                                                                    Velislava Hillman
This paper looks at primary school curriculum for information and communication technologies (ICT) and the digital skills taught and practiced by students in these lessons in comparison to their practices and experiences outside school. Discrepancies between what children make with digital tools outside school and during ICT lessons are identified and used to design and test a model that enables digital, social and interpersonal skills learning and practice. This paper presents the tested model as a way to transform primary school ICT curriculum and pave the way for contextual digital, social and interpersonal skills practice and acquisition.

The skills children need to acquire today to ensure future job security are evolving from 'perennial' ones to ‘contextual’ (Dede, 2009). The ability to collaborate with people from various backgrounds is of growing importance in information-based economies where work is no longer a solitary experience as in the past (Karoly & Panis, 2004). Classrooms should provide opportunities for group collaboration, contextual digital skills learning and practice. This research demonstrates the objective to use primary level ICT lessons as a platform where children can practice and learn such skills.

Beyond Coding: Youth Creativity, Literacies, and Social Engagement in a Computer Programming Club                                                                                                                                                     Earl Aguilera
As momentum builds around computer programming clubs and broader movements promoting “computer science (CS) for all,” less work has explored the many other ways that young people are developing and demonstrating creative, multimodal literacy practices, as well as social engagement in these CS-focused spaces. The purpose of this paper is to share insights into these issues, based on a study of one such “code club” situated in a public library in the Southwestern United States. Specifically, this paper presents an analysis of data collected over the course of a 10-week summer session of the code club (June 2017 - August 2017). A total of 47 students aged 8-14 participated, which met twice a week with a library facilitator. As part of the study, I collected observational, artefactual, and audio-recorded data from each session, and engaged in first and second cycle qualitative coding (Saldana, 2015) to identify the ways in which students drew on multimodal literacy practices as they navigated, interpreted, interrogated, and designed their learning experiences across virtual and face-to-face contexts (Serafini, 2012). Findings from this study suggest that a wide variety of creative practices can be observed while students engage with digital content, procedural literacies, social contexts ‘beyond the screen.’ This paper contributes to the work of Connected Learning by providing additional evidence into the diverse and multidimensional learning practices that can occur within code clubs and similar environments, as well as the ways that teachers, parents, librarians, and other adults can support students engaging in these practices.

Speakers
avatar for Kristina Stamatis

Kristina Stamatis

Student, University of Colorado Boulder
Teacher. Storyteller. Artist.
avatar for Ricarose Roque

Ricarose Roque

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Boulder
EA

Earl Aguilera

Assistant Professor, California State University, Fresno
VH

Velislava Hillman

Berkman Klein Centre Harvard University


Saturday October 5, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Doheny Beach B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:00am

Design Partnerships for Teaching and Learning
Teacher and Artist Partnerships: Collaborative Design of Integrated Learning Experiences
Anna Jordan-Douglass, Christine Torres, Carly Bogaards


Interdisciplinary curricula has gained momentum as an approach to teaching and learning, and for fostering meaning and understanding in learners, in response to new societal challenges and problems to be solved. Integrating curriculum across disciplines not only makes the subjects more meaningful to students, but promotes democratic schooling by providing learners with choice and active inquiry. In elementary schools, the arts can be used as a way to promote dynamic pathways of interdisciplinary teaching and learning, and give students and teachers new ways to make meaning in their worlds. Through a residency program organized by a local arts organization, formal and informal educators partnered to integrate the arts into a science curriculum with a focus on weathering and erosion. The result of the partnership was 50 2nd grade students structured into six production crews, who each created a mini-documentary featuring puppet hosts and hand-built sets. The students engaged in the science and engineering practices to gather research, identify a real world problem, and design a solution to that problem. The project required all four educators working collaboratively on a set of shared goals, leveraging one another’s expertise, and knowing when and how to lean on additional resources, and is a powerful example of collaborative informal and formal education partnerships to design learning experiences.

Design of Computational Thinking Curriculum for Multilingual Learners
Sharin Rawhiya Jacob, Ha Nguyen, Leiny Garcia, Mark Warschauer, Debra Richardson


University researchers and in-service teachers co-designed a curriculum for computational thinking instruction to upper elementary students.The process was held under a Research Practitioner Partnership, where researchers and practitioners investigated the state of computer science education in a district with a high student population of Hispanic, multilingual learners and of low socio-economic status. Such findings were used to inform the adaption of a curriculum for computational thinking that meets the needs of the districts’ culturally and linguistically diverse students. As a result, an online and open source computational thinking curriculum was designed to align with computer science and literacy standards, provide linguistic scaffolding, include culturally responsive materials, and integrate inquiry based approaches. A showcase of our curriculum will include an explanation of the design process and and overview its unique adaptations.

Meteor Writes
Shoshi Shapiro, Chris Breskey


What happens when a podcaster, a poet, and a playwright, walk into a museum? How does a storyteller find and share the stories of science? Come learn how two Chicago Institution’s Teen Programs teamed up with students and storytellers to answer these questions during the showcase.

From Concept to Classroom: Co-Designing and Implementing an Historical Inquiry Game as a Method to Foster Teacher Professional Growth
Jim Mathews,  David Gagnon


As part of a cross-institutional game design project, our team created a Teacher Fellowship Program that engaged three cohorts of elementary school teachers in co-designing a history game for 3rd-5th grade students. The game, called Jo Wilder and the Capitol Case, is an adventure-style game where players use historical inquiry practices to locate and analyze a series of historical artifacts. The Teacher Fellowship Program had several intersecting goals, including: (1) to produce a freely available video game that would get used in classrooms to develop students’ capacity for doing history (Levsitk & Barton, 2015); and (2) to provide a professional learning experience that would lead to growth in teachers’ knowledge, beliefs and practices tied to the use of games and historical inquiry activities in their teaching. To help us understand how teachers engaged with the Fellowship, we used the Interconnected Model of Teacher Professional Growth (Clarke and Hollingsworth, 2002). This model provided an analytic tool that helped us map the different pathways teachers’ professional learning took. In this presentation we’ll describe the Teacher Fellowship Program, including the principles that guided how and why we developed it. We will also highlight components of the Fellowship that teachers found most salient in relation to their own professional growth and explore how these shaped their beliefs, attitudes and classroom practices. Finally, we’ll identify gaps that need to be addressed in future programming.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Mathews

Jim Mathews

Field Day Lab, University of Wisconsin
Jim Mathews is a teacher, researcher, and designer, exploring the intersection of place, design, and civic engagement.
avatar for Anna Jordan-Douglass

Anna Jordan-Douglass

Chief Creative Officer, Makefully
MW

Mark Warschauer

Professor, UC Irvine
avatar for David Gagnon

David Gagnon

University of Wisconsin
avatar for Chris Bresky

Chris Bresky

Manager of Teen Programs, Adler Planetarium
Chris Bresky is a trained artist and educator who currently works at the Adler Planetarium finding creative ways for the public to engage with science. He is interested in using story and narrative to inspire exploration. He has been awarded the Jon Lipsky Award for Excellence in... Read More →
SJ

Sharin Jacob

PhD in Education Student, University of California, Irvine
SS

Shoshi Shapiro

Digital Learning Coordinator, Field Museum
CT

Christine Torres

Elementary 2nd Grade, Liberty Public Schools
CB

Carly Bogaards

Elementary 2nd Grade, Liberty Public Schools
TC

Thi Cam Ha Nguyen

PhD Student, University of California, Irvine
LG

Leiny Garcia

School of Education


Saturday October 5, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Doheny Beach A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:00am

Connected Learning Experiences: Understanding Creativity, Materiality, Artistry and Affect in Computing
Connected Learning Experiences: Understanding Creativity, Materiality, Artistry and Affect in Computing
Deborah A. Fields Utah State University & Yasmin B. Kafai University of Pennsylvania, Organizers

Overview
Researchers have only recently started to investigate the phenomenology of learning to code (Sengupta, Dickes, & Farris, 2018). That is, little is known about students’ emotional experiences with the process of learning to code and furthermore, how to design environments that support their affective, creative, and artistic experiences with computing. At the same time, we must not forget to consider depth and rigor in learning to code. Instead, we must consider how to provide and study more holistic coding experiences, incorporating the social, emotional, cognitive, and creative aspects into those experiences.
In this symposium we bring together scholars focusing on four different projects where arts and computing converge. They consider the role of computing in traditional material arts, how students bring in unexpected means of creativity to physical computational domains, and how to facilitate a conscious reflection of emotion in computing through art-making. What does it mean to be creative and expressive in computing? How do we intentionally acknowledge and support students’ development in the creative process of coding? Theresa Jean Tanenbaum of the University of California, Irvine, will draw on her expertise in narrative, play, and digital technology in bringing together the various elements from each presentation into a holistic consideration of learning experiences in computing. The session will be organized with a 5-minute interactive introduction by the organizers, followed by 8-minute presentations by each participant, a synthesis by the discussant, and 15-minutes of Q&A discussion with the audience.

Bending the Matrix: Computing as Artifact Transformation with Fiber Crafts 
Anna Keune, Indiana University, Bloomington; Kylie Peppler, University of California, Irvine

The history of the modern computer is deeply intertwined with the materiality of fiber crafts. The Jacquard loom was a model for the earliest digital computer (Essinger, 2007), programmed by women who reasoned with the machine to pioneer foundational programming routines (Abbate, 2012). Today, women are markedly underrepresented in computation and fiber crafts–with the exception of e-textiles–is often disconnected from computing. This risks to obscure the gendered material history of computing and hinders imagining alternative futures for the who and what of computing. We conducted an artifact analysis of computational concepts in weaving and fabric manipulation, 3d embroidery of fabric, with 12 instructors of undergraduate computer science courses. We iteratively coded transcripts for computational concepts and translated the concepts into pseudo-code. We found that challenging programming concepts (e.g., variables, functions) are required for weaving and fabric manipulation. Across creative textile disciplines, participants engaged with both creative practices and high-level computational thinking. As matrix bending process, fabric manipulation promises a space for material programming that is dissimilar to how we traditionally think of computing. Returning to the historic roots of computing, our work highlights fiber crafts as compelling content for computer science learning. Fiber crafts open up a playspace to imagine new computation that promises powerful insights for the design of tangible manipulatives for computer science learning.

Community-Oriented Reflections through Electronic Textiles
Lindsay Lindberg, University of California, Los Angeles, Deborah A. Fields, Utah State University

Electronic Textile projects (e-textiles) challenge hegemonic notions of gender roles and abstraction in both maker and computer science spaces, and can position students as designers and creators of technology, not just passive receivers (Kafai, Fields, Searle 2014). This arts and computing project explicitly connects students’ lived experiences with e-textile murals, deepening their engagement with the content and their identities, while producing unique artifacts integrating elements of visual art. 26 high school students participated in a 13-week e-textiles unit exploring interaction through the development of e-textile projects designed to represent their community using elements of computer science, visual art, and reflection. Through analyzing interview data, student design notebook entries, artist statements and artifacts, we see evidence of students using computational and craft to represent their communities in creative and unexpected ways—coding music, visual lighting effects, and interaction into their crafted pieces. In addition, students leveraged methods and materials not explicitly required in the project to more accurately express what they valued about their chosen communities. Providing reflective writing prompts created space for students to reflect on their coding content knowledge, identify practices to overcome challenges, and connect their lived experiences beyond school to their classroom experience. Connecting personal experiences to intentionally designed computational crafts may contribute to widening participation in computing.

Restorying Geek Identity: Collaborative Quilts as Ideational Resources to Support the (Re)Imagination of Youth
Mia S. Shaw, James Joshua Coleman, University of Pennsylvania

As computer science (CS) education seeks to research more inclusive learning environments for minoritized youth, we must consider how youths’ identities impact their CS participation. Stereotypes about CS can negatively affect youth’s sense of belonging or fit in the field (Cheryan, Plaut, Davies, & Steele, 2009), while CS classrooms and technologies can reproduce dominant narratives that alienate youth from marginalized identities (Ashcraft, Eger, & Scott, 2017). The “Restorying Computer Science Identities” project sought to broaden participation in computing by creating access for groups who have been historically and systemically shut out of CS. During a month-long workshop in a science museum’s STEM program, 13 youth (the majority of whom identify as of color) imagined new CS connections, stories, and identities, learned programming skills and explored the materiality of paper circuits to design interactive, collaborative quilts that reflected their restories. Using video observations and voice recordings, students’ reflective worksheets, artifacts, and interviews, we see students using computer science skills and digital technologies to restory their CS identities; their perceptions of the process of restorying; and how the imaginative act of restorying pushed against the confines of materiality. Findings for this project include the implications of integrating computer science and critical literacies with youth counter-storytelling and the development of intersectional CS identities, particularly as it connects to research and CS pedagogy.

What it’s Like: Stories about Learning to Code through Art Making 
Maggie Dahn, University of California, Los Angeles, David DeLiema, University of California, Berkeley

Our design-based research study positions art making as a point of departure for surfacing, understanding, and responding to students’ emotional experiences with coding. We focus on debugging, the process of figuring out how to fix broken code, because breakdowns in code elicit strong emotion and awareness of experience. As part of a two-week, project-based computer science summer workshop, we asked fifth through tenth grade students (n=63) to make art about their experiences learning to code through different art projects, including abstract watercolors, narrative painting, and poetry. In our design we capitalized on affordances of art to capture complex emotional experience because feeling is central to art making (Langer, 1953

Moderators
TJ

Theresa Jean Tanenbaum

Assistant Professor, UC Irvine

Speakers
avatar for Anna Keune

Anna Keune

Graduate Research Assistant, Indiana University
I am a doctoral candidate in Learning Sciences at Indiana University working with Dr. Kylie Peppler in the Creativity Labs. As a new media artist and designer, she leverages her international experiences across four continents to engage in research that spans across art, technology... Read More →
DF

Deborah Fields

Associate Research Professor, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies... Read More →
KA

Kylie A Peppler

University of California, Irvine
LL

Lindsay Lindberg

University of California, Los Angeles
avatar for Mia Shaw

Mia Shaw

Research Assistant, University of Pennsylvania - GSE
JC

Josh Coleman

University of Pennsylvania
MD

Maggie Dahn

Postdoctoral Scholar, UC-Irvine


Saturday October 5, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Doheny Beach C/D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:00am

Scorpions, Snakes, and Crocodiles: Pitfalls and Aggressions to Avoid When Promoting a Diverse and Inclusive Culture of Collegiate Esports
Collegiate Esports is growing at a phenomenal rate and holds potential benefits that educational institutions are drawn to, such as developing leadership, communication, and team building skills in our young adults (Mott, 2018; Seminski, 2018). The current work on inclusion in Esports program development emphasizes sophisticated plans for codes of conduct, task forces, staff recruitment & training processes, and welcome arena events (Amazan-Hall, et. al, 2018; Wu, 2017) to enhance diversity and inclusion. These sound strategies however, can fall short of fully speaking to current internalized pitfalls and aggressions present within the Esports landscape. Players, fans, coaches, managers, and administrators can often exacerbate inclusionary growth unknowingly and against their own best interests. The current symposium will not only address these biases (both visible and hidden), but also provide remedies and prevention techniques, ensuring the promotion of a sustainable, thriving, diverse, and inclusive culture of Collegiate Esports. The two presentations in this symposium will display practical experience from five universities, including ongoing research from three Universities that includes data on inclusive Esports camps and workshops. The presenters include three female Esports captains, three Esports Directors, two researchers, and one former professional Esports player. The focus will be on providing in-depth player and fan data that reports first-hand accounts and experiences, along with data from a National Science Foundation grant supporting STEM competency development for at-risk youth through Esports activities.

Speakers
AB

Anthony Betrus

Professor of Ed Tech/Esports Director, SUNY Potsdam
SC

Steven Canning

Instructional Designer/Instructor of Ed Tech, SUNY Potsdam
What it is like to compete at a high level in esports. Esports CultureInternet Culture
JE

Jason Engerman

Assistant Professor, East Stroudsburg University


Saturday October 5, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Emerald Bay A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:00am

Beyond Screens: Creating With Multi-Sensory Technologies in the Classroom
Go beyond the computer screen, and engage learners in many modalities of technological creation. In this workshop, participants will experiment with a range of tools and techniques for creating multi-sensory learning experiences which incorporate artmaking and technology. We’ll create with light, sound, textures, motion, scale, electronics, and code - and learn the practicalities of cost and creation in the classroom. As a group, we’ll reflect on our explorations and discuss connections across subject areas. You’ll walk away with new ideas and learning resources to use in your classroom. Join us!

This workshop is facilitated by artist-educators from the MIT Media Lab, the Scratch Team, and the Fab Foundation.

Speakers
LG

Lily Gabaree

MIT Media Lab
avatar for Alethea Campbell

Alethea Campbell

GE Brilliant Career Lab Program Manager, The Fab Foundation
From a very early age, it was apparent that Alethea Campbell did not learn like everyone else. While other students could recite newly memorized vocabulary or follow lengthy verbal instructions, she struggled to keep up with her peers. Some of these early educational experiences left... Read More →
avatar for Kristin Osiecki

Kristin Osiecki

Learning Designer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab
Learning Designer on the Scratch team in the MIT Media Lab's Lifelong Kindergarten Group. Currently creating educational experiences which engage learners in creative programming activities with Scratch.


Saturday October 5, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Emerald Bay D/E 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:00am

Disrupting the Rhetoric of Personalized Learning
All around us, schools, districts, vendors and other learning organizations are making investments in “personalized learning.” But what is personalized learning? Is Connected Learning personalized learning? This workshop invites participants to join us in an exploration of the intersection between personalized learning and Connected Learning. We’ll look at examples from a variety of learning situations to unpack what the CL framework can bring to conversations about PL. We will start by examining student work connected to badges and from portfolios from Youth Voices (youthvoices.live, lrng.org/o/youth-voices) and hear from teachers about its context. Using an adapted looking at student work protocol for small groups, we will ask questions about the products created. Then, using the data generated in these conversations, we will facilitate a whole group discussion of the role of Connected Learning in the conversation surrounding personalized learning. Some questions we might consider:
How do personalized learning and connected learning intersect?
What is the role of a caring grown up in creating good CL/PL experiences?
How are we working to design personalized learning experiences that reflect the CL framework?
What are next steps we can take to advance the field of personalized learning in the direction of CL?
If warranted, the group will collaboratively build an argument for CL as a bedrock of any PL program.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Cantrill

Christina Cantrill

National Programs, National Writing Project
avatar for Paul Allison

Paul Allison

Teacher Consultant, New York City Writing Project
I have been been teaching Humanities, English and technology classes in New York City ever since I graduated from Hunter College, CUNY in 1983, and, after 31 years, I have recently retired. I am a teacher-consultant and Technology Liaison for the New York City Writing Project and... Read More →
avatar for Kristen Turner

Kristen Turner

Professor and Director of Teacher Education, Drew University


Saturday October 5, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Emerald Bay B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

11:00am

Random Encounters: Statistics With a Sense of Adventure
Random Encounters (RE) is a dynamic random number generator, cloaked in an RPG-style interface. It was created to improve education in statistics and experimental design the following three ways: (1) Rewarding students for applying new methods in creative or exploratory ways. Rather than demonstrating knowledge of statistical methods on a multiple-choice exam with pre-specified hypotheses and artificial data, students are taught to infer useful relationships in the virtual world. These inferences demonstrate knowledge to the educator, but more importantly, they demonstrate the usefulness of statistical methods to the student. (2) Providing students access to “big data,” and a personally significant context for interpreting results. Rather than practicing new skills on unrealistic data with arbitrarily named variables, students collect their own data, based on their own interests. This makes the numbers relatable. Furthermore, the data are exported in a format requiring organization before the test of inference. This allows students to practice an essential part of data analysis, which is almost always excluded from introductory courses. (3) Practice communicating quantitative results broadly, and to peers with shared interests. Rather than taking multiple-choice exams for course credit, students gain “peer recognition” by contributing to a growing body of evidence called The Royal Library. Contributions are simple-- an abstract stating the research question, null hypothesis, and non-technical conclusion; a description of the methods for collecting data and testing the null; a figure with caption that clearly supports the non-technical conclusion.

Speakers
JR

Jordan Rashid

University of California
RS

Ryan Stokes

Research Assistant, UCI



Saturday October 5, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Emerald Bay C 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

12:00pm

Lunch
We will provide a boxed lunch. Vegan and vegetarian options available.

Saturday October 5, 2019 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Crystal Cove Auditorium Foyer

1:30pm

Connected Learning in Libraries
Supporting Educator Reflection and Agency Through the Co-Design of Observation Tools and Practices for Informal Learning Environments
Caitlin K Martin, Eric Reyes, Ephran Ramirez, Lisa Brahms, Annie McNamara, Peter Wardrip

Spaces for youth to create what they imagine, such as makerspaces and learning labs, are proliferating in community centers, libraries, schools, and museums. There is still much to learn about how to document what happens in these spaces, especially in ways that can support educators in design and practice. In this paper, we share exploratory, ongoing design-based research investigating how making and learning practices are interpreted and identified by educators working in library spaces connecting teens to tools, mentorship, and support for creative production. First, we share how researchers and educators codesigned observation tools, building on existing frameworks for the learning practices of making. Next, emergent themes are presented including the importance of organizational history and support, shifting educator perceptions from observation as top-down evaluation to observation as a professional learning opportunity in support of practitioner-led advocacy, and ideas for changes in organizational practice. Implications and future work are discussed.

Facilitated Learning in the Library: A Case Study of Youth Services in an Urban Public Library System 
Peter Wardrip, Thomas Akiva

Public libraries have historically been seen as warehouses for resources with library staff to help search. This is reflected in formal library education that emphasizes organizing and searching skills. However, as libraries have evolved to become community spaces that house maker spaces, social groups, music events and job fairs. Libraries meet the needs of their communities as spaces for socializing, exploring and learning. Library staff are at the crux of the tension between an old model of quiet individual learning and the new model of social and collaborative learning. This case study attempts to understand how this tension plays out in an urban library system. We interviewed 16 youth services library staff as well as two administrative supervisors using a new, meme-based tool for eliciting conversation around these tensions. Preliminary results find that library staff feel pressure from the community to provide access to electronic resources while keeping youth quiet and pressure from the library to meet externally defined goals such as workforce readiness and academic proficiency. At the same time, the staff see inherent value in connecting with and building relationships with youth. Looking forward, it seems that public libraries such as this could benefit from a facilitated learning model that values relationships as part of the collaborative and active learning process.

Parent Perspectives on Interfacing With Computing Opportunities in Library Settings
Sari Widman, Ricarose Roque

Libraries have the potential to be important sites for youth and families, particularly from high-need populations, to engage in the development of computational literacies needed to fully participate in our digital society. In this study, we focus on the perspectives, interests, and needs of parents and the ways they might take up technology-based opportunities within library settings. Parents can play important roles in their children’s technological development as they make decisions and broker resources from their community for their children. We conducted focus groups at two library sites to ask parents about their family’s relationship with technology, their local library, and other community resources. Their perspectives highlight the ways libraries must pay attention to how their physical interface (e.g. entrance, parking, and spaces), as well as their social and emotional interfaces can impact families’ participation in new and emerging technology-based opportunities.

Speakers
avatar for Ephran Ramirez

Ephran Ramirez

Lead STEM Mentor - YOUmedia, Chicago Public Library
I'm interested in the intersections of science education and social justice.Science should be made accessible to all youth, regardless of race, class, gender, orientation, etc. Finding ways to eliminate the barriers in science education is crucial to our success as a whole and to... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Brahms

Lisa Brahms

Director of Learning & Research, Children's Museum of Pittsburgh
Lisa Brahms, Ph.D. is Director of Learning and Research at Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, as well as a visiting researcher with the University of Pittsburgh Center for Learning in Out of School Environments (UPCLOSE).  Lisa earned her PhD in Learning Sciences and Policy at the... Read More →
avatar for Eric Reyes

Eric Reyes

Digital Media Coordinator, Chicago Public Library
Eric Reyes works in the Teen Services/YOUmedia Department of the Chicago Public Library. Prior to joining CPL, Eric worked in education with formerly incarcerated adults, as a recording instructor, and as a facilitator/engineer at StoryCorps Chicago. Eric has a MA in Sociology and... Read More →
avatar for Ricarose Roque

Ricarose Roque

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Boulder
avatar for Peter Wardrip

Peter Wardrip

Assistant Professor of STEAM Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Peter Wardrip is an Assistant Professor of STEAM Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research focuses on informal/formal learning collaborations, professional learning for educators, formative assessment and making as a learning process. Peter earned his PhD in Learning... Read More →
avatar for Caitlin Martin

Caitlin Martin

Design and Research, CKMartin Consulting
TA

Thomas Akiva

Associate Professor, University of Pittsburgh School of Education
avatar for Sari Widman

Sari Widman

Graduate Research Assistant, University of Colorado Boulder


Saturday October 5, 2019 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Doheny Beach B 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

1:30pm

New Game-Based Learning Quests
Manzanar Immersive: A Live Interactive Narrative Experience
Randall Fujimoto


Manzanar Immersive is a live interactive narrative experience that shares important lessons about the Japanese American World War II history in a hands-on environment that combines the storytelling of immersive theater with the engaging nature of escape game puzzles.

Manzanar Immersive is a completely in-person, “empathy” experience in which teams of people collaborate to solve puzzles, complete activities, and interact with character actors as they proceed through the narrative of a Japanese American family living through the wartime experience. Manzanar Immersive helps people of all ages learn about Japanese American history, culture, and values along with other learning skills, such as collaboration, communication, and empathy.

Manzanar Immersive is designed to be a modular, mobile production that can be setup and used in various locations, including schools and museums. The entire production takes place in a single, classroom space that is partitioned off into separate areas. The design is intended to be used as a framework for educational live interactive narrative experiences about other learning content, including any K-12 and college academic subjects.

Manzanar Immersive debuted at the Gardena Valley Japanese Cultural Institute in March, 2019.

Education in an Era of Viral Deception: NewsFeed Defenders
Peter Paccone

What do good games and good journalism have in common? How do their differences actually help us use games to teach news literacy skills? The team at iCivics will present on their new game, NewsFeed Defenders, and outline how a civics education site took a step into the ever-important world of news literacy.

The MetaLiteracy Augmented Reality Quest (MARQ)
Andrew White


This project aims to study the potential impact of using augmented reality (AR) game technology to engage new generations of researchers with library resources--both virtual (i.e. digital subscriptions, ebooks, abstracting databases, digital photo archives) and physical collections ( i.e. books, archives, diagrams, charts, photos, recordings, etc.). Across education environments, less emphasis is placed on teaching students basic and vital information literacy skills. Although the Internet is a useful tool, younger generations lack a deeper understanding of the variety of information sources required for conducting research, often choosing the first websites that appear from a search engine. Meanwhile, many libraries contain unique, peer-reviewed, curated, and vetted information resources, which often go unused by students, thereby leading to unintentional plagiarism, accidental copyright infringement, and ignorant research.

MARQ is an augmented reality game quest designed to guide students through the process of locating, evaluating, applying, and citing sources in the library. The application will lead students through the library, prompting the user to interact with the wide variety of information sources and formats that libraries provide. At different points in their library journey, students find hints on how to complete their “quest.” Some clues (images, videos, and/or documents) are superimposed virtually via the game device camera lens over the physical space. By utilizing game play as a method to familiarize students with library resources and increase skill acquisition and retention, future increased usage of the physical and digital library could yield information that sparks novel ideas and leads to new knowledge creation.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Paccone

Peter Paccone

Social Studies Teacher, San Marino High School
I am the Coordinating Editor for KQED’s In the Classroom blog. I am also a San Marino High School school social studies teacher with over 30 years of teaching experience. I write frequently for many education-related online publications (Edutopia, PBS’s Teacher Lounge, Poll Everywhere... Read More →
AW

Andrew White

Director, Library Information Services, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
avatar for Randall Fujimoto

Randall Fujimoto

Game-Based Learning Designer, GameTrain Learning, Inc.
Randall Fujimoto is the executive director of GameTrain Learning, an educational nonprofit organization that promotes game-based learning in schools and organizations. Randall has been creating game-based educational and training programs for over 10 years, prior to which he was an... Read More →


Saturday October 5, 2019 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Doheny Beach A 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

1:30pm

Cultivating Creative Learning Communities Across Contexts: Opportunities, Challenges, and Potential Paths
In today's rapidly changing society, the ability to think and act creatively is becoming recognized as an essential skill. A growing number of educational initiatives are promoting creative learning—where children learn through making projects that build on their
interests, in collaboration with peers, through a process of tinkering and experimenting. This session will provide participants with a variety of perspectives on creative learning initiatives around the world: Brazil, Italy, Japan, Kenya, South Africa, and
the United States. The presenters will share their experiences facilitating creative learning initiatives in their local contexts. Although these initiatives grow out of a common learning philosophy, they are taking different approaches—from grassroots organizing
of local workshops and festivals to facilitating online communities where educators exchange ideas and resources. By highlighting diverse strategies, challenges, and opportunities, we seek to engage participants in a conversation of how we can collectively
cultivate creative learning communities across the globe.

Speakers
YM

Yumiko Murai

Postdoctoral Associate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Carolina Rodeghiero

Carolina Rodeghiero

PhD Researcher, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
CP

Carmelo Presicce

MIT Media Lab
YA

Yusuf Ahmad

Research Assistant, MIT Media Lab
LG

Lily Gabaree

MIT Media Lab
MM

Marian Muthui

Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Saturday October 5, 2019 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Doheny Beach C/D 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

1:30pm

From Computational Equity to Computational Justice: Critical, Culturally Relevant and Social Impact Computing Education
How should we think about computing education and its relationship to justice? While dominant equity frames around computer science education center on making CS learning accessible to all youth (‘for all’) and especially under-represented groups (‘broadening participation’), these frames have notable limitations when it comes to questions of justice. There are, however, many research and practice initiatives in formal and informal digital media spaces that share a commitment to justice -- from anti-racist design tools to sociotechnical economic empowerment -- as a core value, with distinct visions and differently grounded approaches. In this structured poster session computing education researchers and practitioners will share examples of different justice-centered CS education projects. We analytically group these projects into three “families”: (1) Computing education for social impact (technology as a means of promoting social change); (2) Critical computational literacies (technology as subject of critique and site of resistance or remix); and (3) Culturally Responsive Computing (computing as situated practice in cultural context). This session will explore the divergences and convergences within and across these “families” of justice-centered computing education, promoting interrogations of the dominant pedagogical and methodological assumptions around CS teaching and learning. By challenging these established boundaries, we aim to radically reimagine who, where, and what counts as computing education across all sites of learning and cultural participation.

Speakers
LC

Laquana Cooke

Assistant Professor, West Chester University
WB

William Babbitt

Research Associate, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
EF

Evelyn Flores

Northwestern University
avatar for Breanne K Litts

Breanne K Litts

Assistant Professor, Utah State University
ML

Michael Lachney

Michigan State University
DF

Deborah Fields

Associate Research Professor, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies... Read More →
avatar for Denise C Nacu

Denise C Nacu

Assistant Professor, DePaul University
PG

Patricia Garcia

Assistant Professor, School of Information, University of Michigan
Patricia Garcia is an Assistant Professor in the School of Information at the University of Michigan who conducts interdisciplinary action research on the intersections between race, gender, and technology.
avatar for Rafi Santo

Rafi Santo

CSforALL, Telos Learning
SV

Sara Vogel

PhD Candidate, CUNY Graduate Center
LL

Lindsay Lindberg

University of California, Los Angeles
KS

Kristin Searle

Assistant Professor, Utah State University
JN

Jaye Nias

Assistant Professor, Spelman College
JR

Jean Ryoo

Director of Research, CS Equity Project, UCLA Center X
MY

Marcos Ynoa

Research Assistant, CUNY


Saturday October 5, 2019 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Emerald Bay D/E 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

1:30pm

Immersive Literacy Workshop: Adult Capacity Building in the Reach Every Reader Project
Adults are the most important resource for impacting the lives and early literacy skills of young children. However, the most effective methods for supporting early literacy don’t necessarily come naturally, and adults may face barriers they are not even aware of such as bias and a lack of empathy. The Adult Capacity Building team within the Reach Every Reader project has developed a set of immersive experiences with varying levels of technology, with the goal of researching in what ways these media can scaffold the learning of best practices in supporting young children’s literacy development. In this workshop participants will learn about some of the literacy approaches like dialogic reading, and they will be able to try out a handful of digital experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Scot Osterweil

Scot Osterweil

Creative Director, MIT Education Arcade/Game Lab
Scot Osterweil is Creative Director of the Education Arcade in the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program. He has designed award-winning games in both academic and commercial environments, focusing on what is authentically playful in challenging academic subjects. Designs include the... Read More →
avatar for Louisa Rosenheck

Louisa Rosenheck

Associate Director, MIT Playful Journey Lab
Louisa Rosenheck is the Associate Director and Creative Lead of the MIT Playful Journey Lab. She manages the design, content, and development of educational games and software, and oversees the research on how ed tech can be effectively used in both formal and informal educational... Read More →


Saturday October 5, 2019 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Emerald Bay C 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697

2:30pm

PM Break
Saturday October 5, 2019 2:30pm - 2:45pm
Crystal Cove Auditorium Foyer

2:45pm

Ignites Talks + Closing Remarks
Ignite talks are radically different from traditional conference talks. You will be dazzled by humor, wit, energy and inspiration packed into one powerful five-minute talk.

Ignite Talks will be hosted by Kim Jaxon.

Crystal City: Modeling Structural Racism in a Fantasy Board Game
Gerald Dryer

LRNG Podcast Playlists
La Toia J Brown

Data Education in Scottish Schools
Tommy Lawson

Classification of Game-Based Assessments and Their Different Approaches - Let's Ignite a Discussion
Alexander Pfeiffer

Design High-Impact Playful Learning in 60 Minutes or Less!
Jason Rosenblum

Kids DIY Media
Deborah A. Fields and Sara M. Grimes



Speakers
DF

Deborah Fields

Associate Research Professor, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies... Read More →
avatar for Jason Rosenblum

Jason Rosenblum

Assistant Professor of Instruction, University of Texas
Games, learning, engagement, social impact. Rinse, recycle, repeat.
avatar for La Toia J Brown

La Toia J Brown

Executive Director, Nerdy Media
avatar for Gerald Dryer

Gerald Dryer

Director of Research, Personalization in Practice - UW Madison
Gerald Dryer Is the Research Director for the Personalization in Practice research group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research explores the relation between social justice and personalized learning in schools. His 24 year career as an educator includes classroom practice... Read More →
AP

Alexander Pfeiffer

Senior Researcher, MIT
avatar for Tommy Lawson

Tommy Lawson

Schools Technology Adviser, University of Edinburgh
Experienced in operational through to strategic in many aspects of digital learning including school design (23 so far), mobile learning, inspiring learning spaces and technology, assistive technology, safer internet, web, social media. Experienced engineer / learning and assistive... Read More →


Saturday October 5, 2019 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Crystal Cove Auditorium 311 Peltason Dr., Irvine, CA, 92697